time sensorial-concept-Mcs
(time)

McsHitp-creation:: {2019-09-19},

overview of time

description::
· time is a-continuous measure of doing of the-Universe.
===
"(adj) temporal (of or relating to or limited by time) "temporal processing"; "temporal dimensions"; "temporal and spacial boundaries"; "music is a temporal art""
[http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=temporal]

name::
* Mcs.filMcsTime.last.html!⇒time,
* Mcs.dirCor/filMcsTime.last.html!⇒time,
* Mcs.TIME,
* Mcs.time,
* Mcs.temporal!~adjv,
====== langoKomo:
* McsKmo.to!=time,
====== langoGreek:
* McsEll.χρόνος!~ο,

notation of time

description::
· since {2020-08-24} I added time search in my-worldview.
· {1959} year.
· {1959-02-17} date,
· {1959-to-1989}.
· {2019-10-25.10-59-17.CrGn-Utc+3}
· {Bp-10'000} = 10'000 years before-present.
· {Bp-b10} = 10-billions before-present.
· {Bp-m10} = 10-millions before-present.
· {Bca-10'000} = 10'000 years before-current-era ≡ {Bp-12'000}.

name::
* Mcs.name-notation.time-{},
* Mcs.name-notation.{time},
* Mcs.time'notation-{},

relation of time

description::
· time-relation is a-relation of an-entity[a] and a-time of it[a].

name::
* Mcs.relation.time,
* Mcs.time-relation,
* Mcs.time'relation,
====== langoKomo:
* McsKmo.ro-to!=time-relation,
* McsKmo.ta!~conjKmo!=time-relation,

clock of time

description::
"A clock is an instrument used to measure, keep, and indicate time. The clock is one of the oldest human inventions, meeting the need to measure intervals of time shorter than the natural units: the day, the lunar month, and the year. Devices operating on several physical processes have been used over the millennia.
Some predecessors to the modern clock may be considered as "clocks" that are based on movement in nature: A sundial shows the time by displaying the position of a shadow on a flat surface. There is a range of duration timers, a well-known example being the hourglass. Water clocks, along with the sundials, are possibly the oldest time-measuring instruments. A major advance occurred with the invention of the verge escapement, which made possible the first mechanical clocks around 1300 in Europe, which kept time with oscillating timekeepers like balance wheels.[1][2][3][4]"
[{2019-10-25} https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clock]

name::
* Mcs.clock,
* Mcs.time'clock,

resource of time

name::
* Mcs.time'resource,

addressWpg::
*

EVOLUTING of time

name::
* Mcs.time'evoluting,

{time.2019-09-19}::
=== McsHitp-creation:
· creation of current concept.

GENERIC of time

generic-chain::
* continous-generic-entity,
* doing-of-Universe,
* doing,
* entity,

time.SPECIFIC

name::
* Mcs.time.specific,

specific::
* Uom-of-time,
* semaso-time,
* point-time,
* pointNo-time,
* definite-time,
* definiteNo-time,
* relative-time,
* relativeNo-time,
===
* age,

time.semaso

description::
· semaso-time is any semaso-concept languages create for the-time-concept.

name::
* Mcs.semaso-time!⇒timeSms,
* Mcs.time.semaso!⇒timeSms,
* Mcs.timeSms,

time.interrogative

description::
· time interrogative.

name::
* Mcs.time.interrogative,
* Mcs.timeSms.interrogative,
* Mcs.when,
====== langoKomo:
* McsKmo.to-cio!=when,
====== langoGreek:
* McsEll.πότε,

time.point

description::
· time-point is time we consider without structure.
===
"One of the weirder transitions from childhood to modern internet life was stopping thinking of new year's as a single point in time, and instead thinking of it as a process that takes place over the course of 25 hours."
[https://twitter.com/VitalikButerin/status/1212207879597412352 {2020-01-01}]

name::
* Mcs.point-in-time,
* Mcs.time-point,
* Mcs.time.intervalNo,
* Mcs.time.point,
* Mcs.timepoint,
====== langoKomo:
* McsKmo.to-doto!=time.point,

time-point.midday

description::
"(n) noon, twelve noon, high noon, midday, noonday, noontide (the middle of the day)"
[wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=midday]

name::
* Mcs.midday,

time-point.midnight

description::
"(n) midnight (12 o'clock at night; the middle of the night) "young children should not be allowed to stay up until midnight""
[wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=midnight]

name::
* Mcs.midnight,

time.pointNo (interval)

description::
· time-interval is time between time-points.

name::
* Mcs.time-interval,
* Mcs.time-period,
* Mcs.time.interval,
* Mcs.time.pointNo,
* Mcs.timeinterval,

syntax.time-interval

description::
_txtEng: _stxSbj:(She) _stxVrb:(read) _stxObj:(the book) _stxTime:(during the class).
_txtEng: _stxSbj:(we) _stxVrb:(had) _stxSbjc:(a discussion) _stxTime:(over lunch).

name::
* Mcs.syntax.conj.during:time,
* Mcs.syntax.conj.over:time,
* Mcs.syntax.time-interval,

time-interval.closed

description::
· closed-time-interval is a-time-interval with both its time-points defined.

name::
* Mcs.closed-time-interval,
* Mcs.time-interval.closed,

time-interval.open

description::
· open-time-interval is a-time-interval with one of its time-points undefined.

name::
* Mcs.open-time-interval,
* Mcs.time-interval.open,

time-interval.early

description::
· early-time-interval is the-first part of a-time-interval.

name::
* Mcs.early-time-interval,
* Mcs.time-interval.early,

time-interval.middle

description::
· middle-time-interval is the-middle part of a-time-interval.

name::
* Mcs.middle-time-interval,
* Mcs.time-interval.middle,

time-interval.end

description::
· end-time-interval is the-last part of a-time-interval.

name::
* Mcs.end-time-interval,
* Mcs.time-interval.end,

time.definite

description::
· definite-time is time with clear boundaries.

name::
* Mcs.definite-time,
* Mcs.time.definite,

time.definite.deictic

description::
· time definite, deictic.

name::
* Mcs.time.definite.deictic,
====== langoKomo:
* McsKmo.to-dhio!=time.deictic,

time.definite.deictic.present

description::
· time, point|interval, definite, deictic, present.

name::
* Mcs.time.definite.deictic.present,

time.definite.deictic.current

description::
· time, point|interval, definite, deictic, current.
===
"(n) present, nowadays (the period of time that is happening now; any continuous stretch of time including the moment of speech) "that is enough for the present"; "he lives in the present with no thought of tomorrow""
[http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=present]
"(n) now (the momentary present) "Now is a good time to do it"; "it worked up to right now""
"(adv) now, at present (at the present moment) "goods now on sale"; "the now-aging dictator"; "they are now abroad"; "he is busy at present writing a new novel"; "it could happen any time now""
[http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=now]

name::
* Mcs.current-time,
* Mcs.now,
* Mcs.present,
* Mcs.time.current,
* Mcs.time.definite.deictic.current,
====== langoKomo:
* McsKmo.to-dhio!=now,
====== langoGreek:
* McsEll.τώρα,

time.definite.deictic.currentNo

description::
· time, point|interval, definite, deictic, currentNo.

name::
* Mcs.then,
* Mcs.time.definite.deictic.currentNo,
====== langoGreek:
* McsEll.τότε,

time.definite.quantity.none

description::
· time definite, quantity none.

name::
* Mcs.never,
* Mcs.time.definite.quantity.none,
====== langoKomo:
* McsKmo.to-po!=time.none,
====== langoGreek:
* McsEll.ποτέ,

time.definiteNo

description::
· definiteNo-time is time identifiable but with No clear boundaries.

name::
* Mcs.indefinite-time,
* Mcs.time.definiteNo,

time.definiteNo.quantity.one

description::
· time definiteNo, quantity one.

name::
* Mcs.once,
* Mcs.sometime,
* Mcs.then,
* Mcs.time.definiteNo.quantity.one,
====== langoKomo:
* McsKmo.to-tioFo!=time.definiteNo.one,
====== langoGreek:
* McsEll.τότε,

time.definiteNo.quantity.oneNo

description::
· time definiteNo quantity oneNo.

name::
* Mcs.sometimes,
* Mcs.time.definiteNo.quantity.oneNo,
====== langoKomo:
* McsKmo.to-dioUgo-foUgo!=time.definiteNo.oneNo,

time.definiteNo.quantity.all

description::
· time definiteNo, quantity all.

name::
* Mcs.allways,
* Mcs.everytime,
* Mcs.time.definiteNo.quantity.all,
* Mcs.timeSms.definiteNo.quantity.all,
====== langoKomo:
* McsKmo.to-bo!=time.all,
====== langoGreek:
* McsEll.πάντα,
* McsEll.πάντοτε,

time.definiteNo.quantity.any

description::
· time definiteNo, quantity any.

name::
* Mcs.anytime,
* Mcs.time.definiteNo.quantity.any,
* Mcs.whenever,
====== langoKomo:
* McsKmo.to-nio!=time.any,
====== langoGreek:
* McsEll.οποτεδήποτε,

time.relative

description::
· relative-time is time defined in relation to another time.
===
"(adj) relative, comparative (estimated by comparison; not absolute or complete) "a relative stranger""
[http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=relative]

name::
* Mcs.relative-time,
* Mcs.time.relative,
====== langoKomo:
* McsKmo.to-tio!=time.relative,

time.relative.before-time

description::
· time, relative, before time.

name::
* Mcs.time.relative.before-time,
--- conjunction:
* Mcs.before!~conj,
====== langoKomo:
* McsKmo.to-ana-to,
--- conjunction:
* McsKmo.ana!~conjKmo!=before,

time.relative.same-time

description::
"(adj) coincident, coincidental, coinciding, concurrent, co-occurrent, cooccurring, simultaneous (occurring or operating at the same time) "a series of coincident events""
[http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=concurrent]
"(adj) synchronous, synchronal, synchronic (occurring or existing at the same time or having the same period or phase) "recovery was synchronous with therapy"- Jour.A.M.A.; "a synchronous set of clocks"; "the synchronous action of a bird's wings in flight"; "synchronous oscillations""
[http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=synchronous]

name::
* Mcs.time.relative.same-time,
--- adjective:
* Mcs.concurrent!~adjv,
* Mcs.simultaneous!~adjv,
* Mcs.synchronous!~adjv,
====== langoKomo:
* McsKmo.to-ena-to,

time.relative.after-time

description::
· time, relative, after time.

name::
* Mcs.time.relative.after-time,
--- conjunction:
* Mcs.after!~conj,
====== langoKomo:
* McsKmo.to-ina-to,
--- conjunction:
* Mcs.ina!~conj,

syntax of time.relative.after-time

description::
· English:
_txtEng: _stxTime:(after the launch) _stxSbj:(the commander) _stxVrb:(will give) _stxObj:(additional instructions) _stxTowhom:(to the astronaut).

name::
* Mcs.syntax.conj.after:time,
* Mcs.syntax.time.relative.after-time,

time.relative.before-current-time

description::
· time, relative, before current-time.

name::
* Mcs.past,
* Mcs.time.relative.before-current-time,
====== langoKomo:
* McsKmo.to-ano!=time.past,

time.relative.same-current-time

description::
· time, relative, same current-time.

name::
* Mcs.present,
* Mcs.time.relative.same-current-time,
====== langoKomo:
* McsKmo.to-eno!=time.present,

time.relative.after-current-time

description::
· time, relative, after current-time.

name::
* Mcs.future,
* Mcs.time.relative.after-current-time,
====== langoKomo:
* McsKmo.to-ino!=time.future,

time.relative.around-time

description::
· time, relative, around-time,

name::
* Mcs.around-time,
* Mcs.time.around-time,
* Mcs.time.relative.around-time,
* Mcs.around!~conj,
====== langoGreek:
* McsEll.γύρω-στο!~conjEll!=around,
* McsEll.περί!~conjEll!=around,
* McsEll.προς!~conjEll!=around,

time.relative.between-time

description::
· time, relative, between time.

name::
* Mcs.time.between-time,
* Mcs.time.relative.between-time,
--- conjunction:
* Mcs.between..and!~conj,
* Mcs.until!~conj,

syntax of time.relative.between-time

description::
· English:
_txtEng: _stxTime:(Between 1942 and 1944) _stxSbj:(the Frank and Van Damm families) _stxVrb:(were hiding) _stxSpace:(in a Amsterdam office building).
_txtEng: _stxSbj:(they) _stxVrb:(will continue) _stxWhat:(_stxVrb:(to do) _stxManner:(so) _stxTime:(until 1998)).

name::
* Mcs.syntax.conj.between..and:time,
* Mcs.syntax.time.relative.between-time,
* Mcs.syntax.conj.until:time,

time.relative.sequence

description::
· time, relative, sequence.

name::
* Mcs.time-line,
* Mcs.time.relative.sequence,

time.relative.synchronous

description::
·

name::
* Mcs.time.relative.synchronous,

time.relativeNo

description::
· relativeNo-time is time NOT-defined in relation to another time.

name::
* Mcs.absolute-time,
* Mcs.time.relativeNo,
====== langoKomo:
* McsKmo.to-tioUgo!=time.relativeNo,

time.unit-of-measurement

description::
· time-Uom is a-Uom for time.

name::
* Mcs.UomTime, {2020-04-23},
* Mcs.time-Uom!⇒UomTime,
* Mcs.time.unit-of-measurement!⇒UomTime,

Horology of UomTime

description::
"Horology ("the study of time", related to Latin horologium from Greek ὡρολόγιον, "instrument for telling the hour", from ὥρα hṓra "hour; time" and -o- interfix and suffix -logy)[1][2] is the study of the measurement of time. Clocks, watches, clockwork, sundials, hourglasses, clepsydras, timers, time recorders, marine chronometers, and atomic clocks are all examples of instruments used to measure time. In current usage, horology refers mainly to the study of mechanical time-keeping devices, while chronometry more broadly includes electronic devices that have largely supplanted mechanical clocks for the best accuracy and precision in time-keeping.
People interested in horology are called horologists. That term is used both by people who deal professionally with timekeeping apparatus (watchmakers, clockmakers), as well as aficionados and scholars of horology. Horology and horologists have numerous organizations, both professional associations and more scholarly societies. The largest horological membership organisation globally is the NAWCC, the National Association of Watch and Clock Collectors, which is USA based, but also has local chapters elsewhere."
[{2019-10-25} https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Horology]

name::
* Mcs.Horology,

calendar of UomTime

description::
· calendar is a-system-of-measurement of days.
===
"(n) calendar (a system of timekeeping that defines the beginning and length and divisions of the year)"
[http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=calendar]
===
"A calendar is a system of organizing days for social, religious, commercial or administrative purposes. This is done by giving names to periods of time, typically days, weeks, months and years. A date is the designation of a single, specific day within such a system. A calendar is also a physical record (often paper) of such a system. A calendar can also mean a list of planned events, such as a court calendar or a partly or fully chronological list of documents, such as a calendar of wills.
Periods in a calendar (such as years and months) are usually, though not necessarily, synchronised with the cycle of the sun or the moon. The most common type of pre-modern calendar was the lunisolar calendar, a lunar calendar that occasionally adds one intercalary month to remain synchronised with the solar year over the long term.
The term calendar is taken from calendae, the term for the first day of the month in the Roman calendar, related to the verb calare "to call out", referring to the "calling" of the new moon when it was first seen.[1] Latin calendarium meant "account book, register" (as accounts were settled and debts were collected on the calends of each month). The Latin term was adopted in Old French as calendier and from there in Middle English as calender by the 13th century (the spelling calendar is early modern). A calendar can be on paper or electronic device."
[{2019-10-18} https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Calendar]

name::
* Mcs.UomTime'calendar,
* Mcs.calendar,
====== langoKomo:
* McsKmo.to-kio-sistemo!=time.system-of-measurement,
====== langoEsperanto:
* McsEpo.kalendaro,
====== langoGreek:
* McsEll.ημερολόγιο!~το,

calendar.Gregorian

description::
"The Gregorian calendar is the calendar used in most of the world.[1] It is named after Pope Gregory XIII, who introduced it in October 1582.
The calendar spaces leap years to make the average year 365.2425 days long, approximating the 365.2422-day tropical year that is determined by the Earth's revolution around the Sun.
... The calendar was developed as a correction to the Julian calendar, shortening the average year by 0.0075 days to stop the drift of the calendar with respect to the equinoxes."
[{2019-10-21} https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gregorian_calendar]

name::
* Mcs.CrGn-(calendar.Gregorian),
* Mcs.Gregorian-calendar,
* Mcs.calendar.Gregorian,

adoption of Gregorian-calendar

description::
Year Country/-ies/Areas
* 1582 Spain, Portugal, France, Poland, Italy, Catholic Low Countries, Luxemburg, and colonies
* 1584 Kingdom of Bohemia
* 1610 Prussia
* 1648 Alsace
* 1682 Strasbourg
* 1700 'Germany',[Note 7] Swiss Cantons, Protestant Low Countries, Norway, Denmark
* 1752 Great Britain and colonies
* 1753 Sweden and Finland
* 1873 Japan
* 1875 Egypt
* 1896 Korea
* 1912 China, Albania
* 1915 Latvia, Lithuania
* 1916 Bulgaria
* 1918 Russia, Estonia
* 1919 Romania, Yugoslavia[Note 8]
* 1923 Greece
* 1926 Turkey
* 2016 Saudi Arabia
[{2019-10-21} https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gregorian_calendar#Adoption]

name::
* Mcs.calendar.Gregorian'adoption,

calendar.Julian

description::
"The Julian calendar, proposed by Julius Caesar in 708 AUC (46 BC/BCE), was a reform of the Roman calendar.[1] It took effect on 1 January 709 AUC (45 BC/BCE), by edict.[citation needed] It was designed with the aid of Greek mathematicians and Greek astronomers such as Sosigenes of Alexandria.
The calendar was the predominant calendar in the Roman world, most of Europe, and in European settlements in the Americas and elsewhere, until it was gradually replaced by the Gregorian calendar, promulgated in 1582 by Pope Gregory XIII. The Julian calendar is still used in parts of the Eastern Orthodox Church, in parts of Oriental Orthodoxy and Anabaptism,[2] as well as by the Berbers.[3]
During the 20th and 21st centuries, a date according to the Julian calendar is 13 days earlier than (behind) its corresponding Gregorian date."
[{2019-10-21} https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Julian_calendar]

name::
* Mcs.CrJn-(calendar.Julian),
* Mcs.Julian-calendar,
* Mcs.calendar.Julian,

calendar.AUC

description::
"Ab urbe condita (Latin pronunciation: [ab ˈʊrbɛ ˈkɔndɪtaː]), or Anno urbis conditae (Latin pronunciation: [ˈannoː ˈʊrbɪs ˈkɔndɪtae̯]), often abbreviated as AUC in either case, is a convention that was used in antiquity and by classical historians to refer to a given year in Ancient Rome. Ab urbe condita literally means "from the founded city", while anno urbis conditæ means "in the year of the founded city". Therefore, the traditional year of the foundation of Rome, 753 BC, would be written AUC 1, while AD 1 would be AUC 754. The foundation of the Empire in 27 BC would be AUC 727."
[{2019-10-21} https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ab_urbe_condita]

name::
* Mcs.Ab-urbe-condita,
* Mcs.Anno-urbis-conditae,
* Mcs.AUC,

calendar.regnal-year

description::
"A regnal year is a year of the reign of a sovereign, from the Latin regnum meaning kingdom, rule. Regnal years considered the date as an ordinal, not a cardinal number. For example, a monarch could have a first year of rule, a second year of rule, a third year of rule, and so on, but not a zeroth year of rule.
Applying this ancient epoch system to modern calculations of time, which include zero, is what led to the debate over when the third millennium began. Regnal years are "finite era names", contrary to "infinite era names" such as Christian era, Jimmu era, Juche era, and so on."
[{2019-10-21} https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Regnal_year]

name::
* Mcs.calendar.regnal-year,
* Mcs.regnal-year,

calendar.BCE-CE

description::
· CE = AD,
· BCE = BC,
"The terms anno Domini[note 1][1][2] (AD) and before Christ[note 2][3][4][5] (BC) are used to label or number years in the Julian and Gregorian calendars. The term anno Domini is Medieval Latin and means "in the year of the Lord",[6] but is often presented using "our Lord" instead of "the Lord",[7][8] taken from the full original phrase "anno Domini nostri Jesu Christi", which translates to "in the year of our Lord Jesus Christ".
This calendar era is based on the traditionally reckoned year of the conception or birth of Jesus of Nazareth, with AD counting years from the start of this epoch, and BC denoting years before the start of the era. There is no year zero in this scheme, so the year AD 1 immediately follows the year 1 BC. This dating system was devised in 525 by Dionysius Exiguus of Scythia Minor, but was not widely used until after 800.[9][10]
... Terminology that is viewed by some as being more neutral and inclusive of non-Christian people is to call this the Current or Common Era (abbreviated as CE), with the preceding years referred to as Before the Common or Current Era (BCE). Astronomical year numbering and ISO 8601 avoid words or abbreviations related to Christianity, but use the same numbers for AD years."
[{2019-10-21} https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anno_Domini]

name::
* Mcs.AD-(anno-Domini=CE),
* Mcs.BC-(before-Christ=BCE),
* Mcs.BCE-(before-current-era=BC),
* Mcs.CE-(current|common-era=AD)
* Mcs.anno-Domini-(AD=CE),
* Mcs.before-Christ-(BC=BCE),

calendar.BP

description::
"Before Present (BP) years is a time scale used mainly in archaeology, geology and other scientific disciplines to specify when events occurred in the past. Because the "present" time changes, standard practice is to use 1 January 1950 as the commencement date (epoch) of the age scale,[a] reflecting the origin of practical radiocarbon dating in the 1950s. The abbreviation "BP" has been interpreted retrospectively as "Before Physics";[1] that refers to the time before nuclear weapons testing artificially altered the proportion of the carbon isotopes in the atmosphere, making dating after that time likely to be unreliable.[2][3]
In a convention that is not always observed, many sources restrict the use of BP dates to those produced with radiocarbon dating."
[{2019-10-21} https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Before_Present]

name::
* Mcs.BP-(before-present),
* Mcs.before-physics-(BP),
* Mcs.before-present-(BP),

calendar.solar

description::
·

name::
* Mcs.calendar.solar,
* Mcs.solar-calendar,
* Mcs.time.solar,

calendar.lunar

description::
"A lunar calendar is a calendar based upon the monthly cycles of the Moon's phases (synodic months), in contrast to solar calendars, whose annual cycles are based only directly upon the solar year. The most commonly used calendar, the Gregorian calendar, is a solar calendar system that originally evolved out of a lunar calendar system. A purely lunar calendar is also distinguished from a lunisolar calendar, whose lunar months are brought into alignment with the solar year through some process of intercalation. The details of when months begin varies from calendar to calendar, with some using new, full, or crescent moons and others employing detailed calculations.
Since each lunation is approximately ​29 1⁄2 days (29 days, 12 hours, 44 minutes, 3 seconds, or 29.530588 days), it is common for the months of a lunar calendar to alternate between 29 and 30 days. Since the period of twelve such lunations, a lunar year, is only 354 days, 8 hours, 48 minutes, 34 seconds (354.367056 days), purely lunar calendars lose around 11 days per year relative to the Gregorian calendar. In purely lunar calendars like the Islamic calendar, the lack of intercalation causes the lunar months to cycle through all the seasons of the Gregorian year over the course of a 33 lunar-year cycle.
Although the Gregorian calendar is in common and legal use in most countries, traditional lunar and lunisolar calendars continue to be used throughout the Old World to determine religious festivals and national holidays. Examples of such holidays include Ramadan (Islamic calendar); Easter; the Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Vietnamese, and Mongolian New Year (Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Vietnamese, and Mongolian calendars); the Nepali New Year (Nepali calendar); the Mid-Autumn Festival and Chuseok (Chinese and Korean calendars); Loi Krathong (Thai calendar); Sunuwar calendar; Vesak/Buddha's Birthday (Buddhist calendar); Diwali (Hindu calendars); and Rosh Hashanah (Hebrew calendar)."
[{2019-10-22} https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lunar_calendar]

name::
* Mcs.calendar.lunar,
* Mcs.lunar-calendar,
* Mcs.time.lunar,

calendar.lunisolar

description::
·

name::
* Mcs.calendar.lunisolar,
* Mcs.lunisolar-calendar,
* Mcs.time.lunisolar,

calendar.decimal

description::
"A decimal calendar is a calendar which includes units of time based on the decimal system. For example a "decimal month" would be 1year/10, or 36.5 days long."

name::
* Mcs.calendar.decimal,
* Mcs.decimal-calendar,

UomTime.specific

description::
* millennium,
* century,
* year,
* month,
* week,
* day,
* hour,
* minute,
* second,

name::
* Mcs.UomTime.specific,

UomTime.geologic-001

name::
* Mcs.UomTime.001-geologic,
* Mcs.UomTime.geologic-001,
* Mcs.GTS-geologic-time-scale,
* Mcs.geologic-time,

description::
"The geologic time scale (GTS) is a system of chronological dating that relates geological strata (stratigraphy) to time. It is used by geologists, paleontologists, and other Earth scientists to describe the timing and relationships of events that have occurred during Earth's history. The table of geologic time spans, presented here, agree with the nomenclature, dates and standard color codes set forth by the International Commission on Stratigraphy (ICS)."
[{2020-04-23} https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geologic_time_scale]

specific-tree-of-::
* geologic-eon,
* geologic-era,
* geologic-period,
* geologic-epoch,
* geologic-age,

UomTime.geologic-era

description::
(n) era, epoch (a period marked by distinctive character or reckoned from a fixed point or event)
(n) era, geological era (a major division of geological time; an era is usually divided into two or more periods)
[http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=era]
===
"a long and distinct period of history with a particular feature or characteristic.
- a system of chronology dating from a particular noteworthy event.
synonyms: epoch, age, period, time, eon, span, generation, stage, point in history, date, times, days, years
- a major division of time that is a subdivision of an eon and is itself subdivided into periods.
- a date or event marking the beginning of a new and distinct period of time."
[Google dictionary]
===
"An era is a span of time defined for the purposes of chronology or historiography, as in the regnal eras in the history of a given monarchy, a calendar era used for a given calendar, or the geological eras defined for the history of Earth.
Comparable terms are epoch, age, period, saeculum, aeon (Greek aion) and Sanskrit yuga."
[{2019-10-22} https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Era]

name::
* Mcs.era-UomTime,
* Mcs.geologic-era,
* Mcs.time.era,
* Mcs.UomTime.era,

UomTime.year

description::
"(n) year, twelvemonth, yr (a period of time containing 365 (or 366) days) "she is 4 years old"; "in the year 1920""
[http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=year]

name::
* Mcs.year-time-Uom,
* Mcs.UomTime.year,
* Mcs.time.year,
====== langoKomo:
* McsKmo.to-yiaro!=year,
====== langoEsperanto:
* McsEpo.jaro,
====== langoGreek:
* McsEll.έτος!~το,

year.calendar

description::
"Generally speaking, a calendar year begins on the New Year's Day of the given calendar system and ends on the day before the following New Year's Day, and thus consists of a whole number of days. A year can also be measured by starting on any other named day of the calendar, and ending on the day before this named day in the following year.[1] This may be termed a "year's time", but not a "calendar year". To reconcile the calendar year with the astronomical cycle (which has a fractional number of days) certain years contain extra days ("leap days" or "intercalary days")."
[{2019-10-20} https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Calendar_year]

name::
* Mcs.calendar-year,
* Mcs.year.calendar,
====== langoGreek:
* McsEll.ημερολογιακό-έτος!~το,

year.school

description::
"(n) school year, academic year (the period of time each year when the school is open and people are studying)"
[http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=school+year]

name::
* Mcs.school-year,
* Mcs.year.school,

year.leap

description::
"A leap year (also known as an intercalary year or bissextile year) is a calendar year containing an additional day (or, in the case of lunisolar calendars, a month) added to keep the calendar year synchronized with the astronomical or seasonal year.[1] Because seasons and astronomical events do not repeat in a whole number of days, calendars that have the same number of days in each year drift over time with respect to the event that the year is supposed to track. By inserting (also called intercalating) an additional day or month into the year, the drift can be corrected. A year that is not a leap year is called a common year.
For example, in the Gregorian calendar, each leap year has 366 days instead of 365, by extending February to 29 days rather than the common 28. These extra days occur in years which are multiples of four (with the exception of centennial years not divisible by 400)."
[{2019-10-20} https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leap_year]

name::
* Mcs.leap-year,
* Mcs.year.leap,

year.common

description::
"A common year is a calendar year with 365 days, as distinguished from a leap year, which has 366. More generally, a common year is one without intercalation. The Gregorian calendar, (like the earlier Julian calendar), employs both common years and leap years to keep the calendar aligned with the tropical year, which does not contain an exact number of days."
[{2019-10-20} https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Common_year]

name::
* Mcs.common-year,
* Mcs.year.common,

year.10-decade

description::
"(n) decade, decennary, decennium (a period of 10 years)"
[http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=decade]
===
· in a-poll of 19,322 votes, 47% consider that a-decade starts on the-first year of the-period and 19% at the-end.
[https://twitter.com/VitalikButerin/status/1197637832304668672]
· this is in-contrast-to naming of centuries which we name with its last year.

name::
* Mcs.decade-time-Uom,
* Mcs.UomTime.decade,
* Mcs.time.decade,
====== langoKomo:
* McsKmo.to-yiaro-foPo!=decade,
====== langoEsperanto:
* McsEpo.jarcento,
====== langoGreek:
* McsEll.δεκαετία!~η,

year.100-century

description::
"(n) century (a period of 100 years)"
[http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=century]

name::
* Mcs.century-time-Uom,
* Mcs.UomTime.century,
* Mcs.time.century,
====== langoKomo:
* McsKmo.to-yiaro-foPoPo!=century,
====== langoEsperanto:
* McsEpo.jarcento,
====== langoGreek:
* McsEll.αιώνας!~ο,

year.1000-millennium

description::
"(n) millennium, millenary (a span of 1000 years)"
[http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=millennium]

name::
* Mcs.Ka,
* Mcs.kiloannum,
* Mcs.kyr,
* Mcs.millennium-time-Uom,
* Mcs.UomTime.millennium,
* Mcs.time.Ka,
* Mcs.time.kyr,
* Mcs.time.millennium,
====== langoKomo:
* McsKmo.to-yiaro-kilo!=millennium,
====== langoEsperanto:
* McsEpo.miljaro,
====== langoGreek:
* McsEll.χιλιετία!~η,

year.1000^2

description::
·

name::
* Mcs.Ma,
* Mcs.megaannum,
* Mcs.myr,
* Mcs.time.Ma,
* Mcs.time.myr,
* Mcs.time.year.1000^2,

year.1000^3

description::
·

name::
* Mcs.Ga,
* Mcs.byr,
* Mcs.gigaannum,
* Mcs.time.Ga,
* Mcs.time.byr,
* Mcs.time.year.1000^3,

year.1000^4

description::
·

name::
* Mcs.Ta,
* Mcs.teraannum,
* Mcs.time.Ta,
* Mcs.time.year.1000^4,

year.1000^5

description::
·

name::
* Mcs.Pa,
* Mcs.petaannum,
* Mcs.time.Pa,
* Mcs.time.year.1000^5,

UomTime.month

description::
"(n) calendar month, month (one of the twelve divisions of the calendar year) "he paid the bill last month""
[http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=month]

name::
* Mcs.month-time-Uom,
* Mcs.UomTime.month,
* Mcs.time.month,
====== langoKomo:
* McsKmo.to-mino!=month, from Greek 'μήνας',
====== langoEsperanto:
* McsEpo.monato,
====== langoGreek:
* McsEll.μήνας,

month.January

description::
"(n) January, Jan (the first month of the year; begins 10 days after the winter solstice)"
[http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=January]

name::
* Mcs.January,
* Mcs.month.January,
====== langoKomo:
* McsKmo.to-mino-1-fo!=January,
====== langoEsperanto:
* McsEpo.Januaro,
====== langoGreek:
* McsEll.Ιανουάριος,

month.February

description::
·

name::
* Mcs.February,
* Mcs.month.February,
====== langoKomo:
* McsKmo.to-mino-2-qo!=February,
======langoEsperanto:
* McsEpo.Februaro,
====== langoGreek:
* McsEll.Φεβρουάριος,

month.March

description::
·

name::
* Mcs.March,
* Mcs.month.March,
====== langoKomo:
* McsKmo.to-mino-3-to!=March,
====== langoEsperanto:
* McsEpo.Marŝi,
====== langoGreek:
* McsEll.Μάρτιος,

month.April

description::
·

name::
* Mcs.April,
* Mcs.month.April,
====== langoKomo:
* McsKmo.to-mino-4-so!=April,
====== langoEsperanto:
* McsEpo.Aprilo,
====== langoGreek:
* McsEll.Απρίλιος,

month.May

description::
·

name::
* Mcs.May,
* Mcs.month.May,
====== langoKomo:
* McsKmo.to-mino-5-co!=May,
====== langoEsperanto:
* McsEpo.Majo,
====== langoGreek:
* McsEll.Μάιος,

month.June

description::
·

name::
* Mcs.June,
* Mcs.month.June,
====== langoKomo:
* McsKmo.to-mino-6-ko!=June,
====== langoEsperanto:
* McsEpo.Junio,
====== langoGreek:
* McsEll.Ιούνιος,

month.July

description::
·

name::
* Mcs.July,
* Mcs.month.July,
====== langoKomo:
* McsKmo.to-mino-7-ho!=July,
====== langoEsperanto:
* McsEpo.Julio,
====== langoGreek:
* McsEll.Ιούλιος,

month.August

description::
·

name::
* Mcs.August,
* Mcs.month.August,
====== langoKomo:
* McsKmo.to-mino-8-mo!=August,
====== langoEsperanto:
* McsEpo.Auxgusto,
====== langoGreek:
* McsEll.Αύγουστος,

month.September

description::
·

name::
* Mcs.Septermber,
* Mcs.month.Septermber,
====== langoKomo:
* McsKmo.to-mino-9-ro!=September,
====== langoEsperanto:
* McsEpo.Septembro,
====== langoGreek:
* McsEll.Σεπτέμβριος,

month.October

description::
·

name::
* Mcs.October,
* Mcs.month.October,
====== langoKomo:
* McsKmo.to-mino-10-foPo!=October,
====== langoEsperanto:
* McsEpo.Oktobro,
====== langoGreek:
* McsEll.Οκτώβριος,

month.November

description::
·

name::
* Mcs.November,
* Mcs.month.November,
====== langoKomo:
* McsKmo.to-mino-11-foFo!=November,
====== langoEsperanto:
* McsEpo.Novembro,
====== langoGreek:
* McsEll.Νοέμβριος,

month.December

description::
"(n) December, Dec (the last (12th) month of the year)"
[http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=december]

name::
* Mcs.December,
* Mcs.month.December,
====== langoKomo:
* McsKmo.to-mino-12-foTho!=December,
====== langoEsperanto:
* McsEpo.Decembro,
====== langoGreek:
* McsEll.Δεκέμβριος,

UomTime.week

description::
"(n) week, calendar week (a period of seven consecutive days starting on Sunday)"
[http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=week]

name::
* Mcs.week-time-Uom,
* Mcs.UomTime.week,
* Mcs.time.week,
====== langoKomo:
* McsKmo.to-nedelo!=week, from Russina 'неделю',
====== langoEsperanto:
* McsEpo.semajno,
====== langoGreek:
* McsEll.εβδομάδα,

UomTime.day

description::
"(n) day, twenty-four hours, twenty-four hour period, 24-hour interval, solar day, mean solar day (time for Earth to make a complete rotation on its axis) "two days later they left"; "they put on two performances every day"; "there are 30,000 passengers per day""
[http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=day]

name::
* Mcs.DAY,
* Mcs.day-time-Uom,
* Mcs.UomTime.day,
* Mcs.time.day,
====== langoKomo:
* McsKmo.to-tieno!=day,
====== langoGreek:
* McsEll.μέρα!~η,

am of day

description::
· the-first 12 hours of a-day.

name::
* Mcs.am-(ante-meridies=before-midday),
* Mcs.ante-meridies=before-midday-(am),
====== langoGreek:
* McsEll.πμ-(προ-μεσημβρίας),

pm of day

description::
· the-last 12 hours of a-day.

name::
* Mcs.pm-(post-meridies=after-midday),
* Mcs.post-meridies=after-midday-(pm),
====== langoGreek:
* McsEll.μμ-(μετά-μεσημβρίας),

night of day

description::
"(n) night, nighttime, dark (the time after sunset and before sunrise while it is dark outside)"
[http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=night]

name::
* Mcs.day'night,
* Mcs.night,
====== langoKomo:
* McsKmo.to-nihto!=night,
====== langoGreek:
* McsEll.νύχτα!~η,

daylight of day

description::
"(n) day, daytime, daylight (the time after sunrise and before sunset while it is light outside) "the dawn turned night into day"; "it is easier to make the repairs in the daytime""
[http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=daylight]

name::
* Mcs.daylight,
====== langoKomo:
* McsKmo.to-mero!=daylight,
====== langoGreek:
* McsEll.μέρα!~η,

day.date

description::
· date is an-individual day.
· {1959-02-17}.

name::
* Mcs.date,
* Mcs.day.date,
* Mcs.day.individual,
====== langoKomo:
* McsKmo.to-tieno-koUgo!=day.individual,

day.Monday

description::
· the-first working day.

name::
* Mcs.day.Monday,
* Mcs.Monday,
====== langoKomo:
* McsKmo.to-tieno-1-fo!=Monday,
====== langoGreek:
* McsEll.Δευτέρα!~η,

day.Tuesday

description::
· the-second working day.

name::
* Mcs.day.Tuesday,
* Mcs.Tuesday,
====== langoKomo:
* McsKmo.to-tieno-2-tho!=Tuesday,
====== langoGreek:
* McsEll.Τρίτη!~η,

day.Wednesday

description::
· the-third working day.

name::
* Mcs.day.Wednesday,
* Mcs.Wednesday,
====== langoKomo:
* McsKmo.to-tieno-3-to!=Wednesday,
====== langoGreek:
* McsEll.Τετάρτη!~η,

day.Thursday

description::
· the-forth working day.

name::
* Mcs.day.Thursday,
* Mcs.Thursday,
====== langoKomo:
* McsKmo.to-tieno-4-so!=Thursday,
====== langoGreek:
* McsEll.Πέμπτη!~η,

day.Friday

description::
· the-fifth working day.

name::
* Mcs.day.Friday,
* Mcs.Friday,
====== langoKomo:
* McsKmo.to-tieno-5-co!=Friday,
====== langoGreek:
* McsEll.Παρασκευή!~η,

day.Saturday

description::
· the-first weekend day.

name::
* Mcs.day.Saturday,
* Mcs.Saturday,
====== langoKomo:
* McsKmo.to-tieno-6-ko!=Saturday,
====== langoGreek:
* McsEll.Σάββατο!~η,

day.Sunday

description::
· the-second weekend day.

name::
* Mcs.day.Sunday,
* Mcs.Sunday,
====== langoKomo:
* McsKmo.to-tieno-7-ho!=Sunday,
====== langoGreek:
* McsEll.Κυριακή!~η,

day.relative.before

description::
·

name::
* Mcs.day.relative.previous,
* Mcs.yesterday,
====== langoKomo:
* McsKmo.to-tieno-ano!=yersterday,

day.relative.current

description::
·

name::
* Mcs.day.relative.current,
* Mcs.today,
====== langoKomo:
* McsKmo.to-tieno-eno!=today,

day.relative.after

description::
·

name::
* Mcs.day.relative.next,
* Mcs.tomorrow,
====== langoKomo:
* McsKmo.to-tieno-ino!=tomorrow,

UomTime.hour

description::
"(n) hour, hr, 60 minutes (a period of time equal to 1/24th of a day) "the job will take more than an hour""
[http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=hour]

name::
* Mcs.hour-time-Uom,
* Mcs.UomTime.hour,
* Mcs.time.hour,
====== langoKomo:
* McsKmo.to-oro!=hour, from Greek 'ώρα'
====== langoGreek:
* McsEll.ώρα!~η,

resource of hour.clock

description::
* https://time.is/,

name::
* Mcs.hour'resource,

hour.clock-time

description::
· clock-time is an-individual-time of a-day.

name::
* Mcs.clock-time,
* Mcs.hour.individual,
* Mcs.time-of-day,
====== langoKomo:
* McsKmo.to-oro-koUgo!=hour.individual,

hour.time-zone

description::
"A time zone is a region of the globe that observes a uniform standard time for legal, commercial, and social purposes. Time zones tend to follow the boundaries of countries and their subdivisions instead of longitude, because it is convenient for areas in close commercial or other communication to keep the same time.
Most of the time zones on land are offset from Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) by a whole number of hours (UTC−12:00 to UTC+14:00), but a few zones are offset by 30 or 45 minutes (e.g. Newfoundland Standard Time is UTC−03:30, Nepal Standard Time is UTC+05:45, and Indian Standard Time is UTC+05:30).
Some higher latitude and temperate zone countries use daylight saving time for part of the year, typically by adjusting local clock time by an hour. Many land time zones are skewed toward the west of the corresponding nautical time zones. This also creates a permanent daylight saving time effect."
[{2019-10-22} https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Time_zone]

name::
* Mcs.time-zone,

hour.UTC

description::
"Coordinated Universal Time (or UTC) is the primary time standard by which the world regulates clocks and time. It is within about 1 second of mean solar time at 0° longitude, and is not adjusted for daylight saving time. In some countries, the term Greenwich Mean Time is used."
[{2019-10-22} https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coordinated_Universal_Time]

name::
* Mcs.Coordinated-Universal-Time,
* Mcs.UTC,
* Mcs.hour.UTC,

UomTime.minute

description::
"(n) minute, min (a unit of time equal to 60 seconds or 1/60th of an hour) "he ran a 4 minute mile""
[http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=minute]

name::
* Mcs.minute-time-Uom,
* Mcs.UomTime.minute,
* Mcs.time.minute,
====== langoKomo:
* McsKmo.to-minuto!=minute,
====== langoGreek:
* McsEll.λεπτό!~το,

UomTime.second

description::
"(n) second, sec, s (1/60 of a minute; the basic unit of time adopted under the Systeme International d'Unites)"
[http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=second]

name::
* Mcs.second-time-Uom,
* Mcs.UomTime.second,
* Mcs.time.second,
====== langoKomo:
* McsKmo.to-sekudo!=second,
====== langoGreek:
* McsEll.δευτερόλεπτο!~το,

UomTime.Unix

description::
"Unix time (also known as Epoch time, POSIX time,[1] seconds since the Epoch,[2] or UNIX Epoch time[3]) is a system for describing a point in time. It is the number of seconds that have elapsed since the Unix epoch, that is the time 00:00:00 UTC on 1 January 1970, minus leap seconds. Leap seconds are ignored,[4] with a leap second having the same Unix time as the second before it, and every day is treated as if it contains exactly 86400 seconds.[2] Due to this treatment Unix time is not a true representation of UTC."
[{2019-10-25} https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unix_time]

name::
* Mcs.POSIX-time,
* Mcs.Unix-time,
* Mcs.UomTime.Unix,

addressWpg::
* https://time.is/Unix_time_now,

time.age

description::
"(n) age (how long something has existed) "it was replaced because of its age""
[http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=age]

name::
* Mcs.age-of-entity,
* Mcs.entity'age,
* Mcs.time.age,
====== langoGreek:
* McsEll.ηλικία!~η,

meta-info

this page was-visited times since {2019-09-19}

page-wholepath: synagonism.net / Mws / dirCor / time

SEARCH::
· this page uses 'locator-names', names that when you find them, you find the-LOCATION of the-concept they denote.
GLOBAL-SEARCH:
· clicking on the-green-BAR of a-page you have access to the-global--locator-names of my-site.
· use the-prefix 'time' for sensorial-concepts related to current concept 'time'.
LOCAL-SEARCH:
· TYPE CTRL+F "Mcs.words-of-concept's-name", to go to the-LOCATION of the-concept.
· a-preview of the-description of a-global-name makes reading fast.

footer::
• author: Kaseluris.Nikos.1959
• email:
 imgMail
• edit on github: https://github.com/synagonism/Mcsw/blob/master/dirCor/filMcsTime.last.html,
• comments on Disqus,
• twitter: @synagonism,
• steemit: https://steemit.com/@synagonism,

webpage-versions::
• version.last.dynamic: filMcsTime.last.html,
• version.0-1-0.2019-09-19 draft creation,

support (link)