human.worker
senso-concept-Mcs (worker)

McsHitp-creation:: {2020-07-12}

overview of wrkr

description::
× whole: producing-system,

· worker is a-human that produces satisfiers.

name::
* McsEngl.McsStn000011.last.html//driStn//dirMcs!⇒wrkr,
* McsEngl.dirMcs/dirStn/McsStn000011.last.html!⇒wrkr,
* McsEngl.Econwrkr!⇒wrkr,
* McsEngl.Econworker!⇒wrkr,
* McsEngl.Socecon'03_worker!⇒wrkr,
* McsEngl.Socecon'att002-worker!⇒wrkr,
* McsEngl.economically-active-human!⇒wrkr,
* McsEngl.economy/worker!⇒wrkr,
* McsEngl.hmnWorker!⇒wrkr,
* McsEngl.human.015-worker!⇒wrkr,
* McsEngl.human.worker!⇒wrkr,
* McsEngl.laborer!⇒wrkr,
* McsEngl.society/*worker!⇒wrkr,
* McsEngl.wkr!⇒wrkr,
* McsEngl.wrkr!=McsStn000011,
* McsEngl.wrkr!=human-worker,
* McsEngl.worker//economy!⇒wrkr,
* McsEngl.working-age-human!⇒wrkr,
* McsEngl.worker!⇒wrkr,
====== langoChinese:
* McsZhon.gōngrén-工人!=wrkr,
* McsZhon.工人-gōngrén!=wrkr,
====== langoGreek:
* McsElln.εργαζόμενος!ο!=wrkr,
* McsElln.εργάτης!ο!=wrkr,

01_satisfier of wrkr

description::
· the-satisfier a-worker creates.

name::
* McsEngl.wrkr'01_satisfier,
* McsEngl.wrkr'att002-satisfier,
* McsEngl.wrkr'satisfier,

productivity of wrkr

02_qualification of wrkr

description::
· any skill-(theoritical-practical), diploma, education and experience a-worker has.

name::
* McsEngl.Wkrqlfn!⇒Wkrqualification,
* McsEngl.Wkrqualification,
* McsEngl.wrkr'02_qualification!⇒Wkrqualification,
* McsEngl.wrkr'att005-qualification!⇒Wkrqualification,
* McsEngl.wrkr'qualification!⇒Wkrqualification,
* McsEngl.qualification-of-worker!⇒Wkrqualification,
====== langoGreek:
* McsElln.προσόν-εργαζόμενου!=Wkrqualification,

info-resource of Wkrqualification

description::
* https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2020/09/reckoning-for-skills/,
* https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2020/09/linkedin-online-elearning-skills-jobs-hiring,

name::
* McsEngl.Wkrqualification'resource,

Wkrqualification.education

description::
· theoritical and practical teaching attended.

name::
* McsEngl.Wkrseducation, {2023-08-30},
* McsEngl.Wkrseducation!=worker's-education,
* McsEngl.Wkrqualification.education,
* McsEngl.wrkr'att012-education,
* McsEngl.wrkr'education,

education.theoritical of wrkr

description::
· education only in information.

name::
* McsEngl.Wkrseducation.theoritical,
* McsEngl.theoritical-education,

education.practical of wrkr

description::
""Training" generally refers to a process of learning and acquiring skills, knowledge, or abilities through structured instruction, practice, and experience. It's a systematic approach to improving one's performance or capabilities in a specific area."
[{2023-08-30 retrieved} https://chat.openai.com/?model=text-davinci-002-render-sha]

name::
* McsEngl.Wkrseducation.practical,
* McsEngl.wrkr.practical-education,
* McsEngl.wrkr'att013-practical-education,
* McsEngl.wrkr'practical-education,
* McsEngl.wrkr'training,
* McsEngl.training-of-worker,

Wkrqualification.diploma

description::
· certificates of theoritical and practical education.

name::
* McsEngl.Wkrqualification.academic,
* McsEngl.academic-qualification-of-worker,
* McsEngl.certificate-of-worker,
* McsEngl.educational-qualification-of-worker,
* McsEngl.diploma-of-worker,
* McsEngl.wrkr'att007-diploma,
* McsEngl.wrkr'diploma,

Wkrqualification.skill

description::
· the-theory and practice a-worker knows.

name::
* McsEngl.Wkrqualification.skill,
* McsEngl.skill.006-worker,
* McsEngl.skill.worker,
* McsEngl.wrkr'att008-skill,
* McsEngl.wrkr'skill,

generic-tree-of-worker::
* human'skill,

specific-tree-of-worker'skill::
* practical-skill,
* theoritical-skill,
===
* adaptability,
* collaboration-skill,
* communication-skill,
* critical-thinking,
* curiosity,
* initiative,
* leadership,
* percistency,
* problem-soliving,
* social-and-cultural-awareness,

skill.theoritical of wrkr

description::
· worker'knowledge is the-knowledge a-worker knows.

name::
* McsEngl.wrkr'att009-knowledge,
* McsEngl.wrkr'knowledge,
* McsEngl.wrkr'skill.knowledge,
* McsEngl.wrkr'theoritical-skill,

skill.practical of wrkr

description::
· what a-worker CAN do.

name::
* McsEngl.Wkrqualification.practical-skill,
* McsEngl.wrkr'att010-practical-skill,
* McsEngl.wrkr'practical-skill,
* McsEngl.wrkr'skill.practical,

skill.soft of wrkr

description::
"Soft skills are harder to quantify than hard skills. They're typically what interviewers are trying to gauge by asking about your management style or how you've handled career setbacks in the past."
[{2020-09-25} https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2020/09/linkedin-online-elearning-skills-jobs-hiring]

name::
* McsEngl.Wkrqualification.soft-skill,
* McsEngl.wrkr'skill.soft,
* McsEngl.soft-skill-of-worker,

specific-tree-of-::
* creativity,
* persuation,
* collaboration,
* adaptability,
* emotional-intelligence,

Wkrqualification.experience

description::
· worker'experience is the-working done by a-worker.

name::
* McsEngl.Wkrqualification.experience,
* McsEngl.wrkr'att011-experience,
* McsEngl.wrkr'experience,

Wkrqualification.commodity

description::
"By labour-power or capacity for labour is to be understood the aggregate of those mental and physical capabilities existing in a human being, which he exercises whenever he produces a use-value of any description." [{1887-1867} Marx, Capital-I]

name::
* McsEngl.Wkrqualification.commodity,
* McsEngl.capacity-for-labour,
* McsEngl.labour-power,
====== langoGreek:
* McsElln.εργατική-δύναμη,

03_compensation of wrkr

description::
· any satisfier a-worker gets for work done.

name::
* McsEngl.compensation-of-worker,
* McsEngl.wrkr'03_compensation,
* McsEngl.wrkr'att004-compensation,
* McsEngl.wrkr'compensation,
* McsEngl.wrkr'income,
* McsEngl.wrkr'reward,
* McsEngl.reward-of-worker,
* McsEngl.salary-of-worker,

descriptionLong::
· Average monthly salary after tax:
1. Switzerland $6,187
2. Luxembourg $5,188
3. Singapore $5,028
4. USA $4,660
5. Iceland $4,264
6. Qatar $4,108
7. UAE $3,581
8. Denmark $3,545
9. Netherlands $3,541
10. Australia $3,370
11. Norway $3,345
12. Germany $3,036
13. Canada $3,028
16. UK $2,960
21. Sweden $2,591
22. France $2,515
24. Israel $2,485
25. South Korea $2,454
26. Japan $2,330
28. Saudi Arabia $2,040
29. Spain $1,960
31. Italy $1,714
38. Poland $1,254
40. South Africa $1,189
46. China $1,001
54. Mexico $746
63. India $583
67. Russia $541
76. Brazil $426
77. Argentina $423
82. Turkey $385
86. Indonesia $326
89. Philippines $311
94. Bangladesh $257
98. Pakistan $159
99. Egypt $147
[{2023-07-08 retrieved} World of Statistics https://twitter.com/stats_feed/status/1677687658745585664]

04_oznSatisfier of wrkr

description::
· economic-organization where the-worker works.

name::
* McsEngl.wrkr'04_oznSatisfier,
* McsEngl.wrkr'att014-oznSatisfier,
* McsEngl.wrkr'oznSatisfier,

age of wrkr

description::
·

name::
* McsEngl.wrkr'att003-age,
* McsEngl.wrkr'age,

ageRetirement of wrkr

description::
"Retirement age men / life expectancy:
* 🇩🇰 Denmark: 67 / 80.8,
* 🇬🇷 Greece: 67 / 82.8,
* 🇮🇸 Iceland: 67 / 82.9,
* 🇮🇱 Israel: 67 / 82.8,
* 🇮🇹 Italy: 67 / 83.4,
* 🇺🇸 USA: 67 / 78.9,
* 🇦🇺 Australia: 66.5 / 83.9,
* 🇪🇸 Spain: 66.17 / 83.4,
* 🇬🇧 UK: 66 / 81.4,
* 🇩🇪 Germany: 65.83 / 81.2,
* 🇦🇹 Austria: 65 / 81.6,
* 🇧🇷 Brazil: 65 / 76.6,
* 🇨🇦 Canada: 65 / 82.3,
* 🇲🇽 Mexico: 65 / 75.4,
* 🇫🇷 France: 64 / 82.7,
* 🇫🇮 Finland: 64 / 81.7,
* 🇯🇵 Japan: 64 / 84.5,
* 🇸🇬 Singapore: 63 / 83.6,
* 🇷🇺 Russia: 63 / 72.6,
* 🇳🇴 Norway: 62 / 82.5,
* 🇸🇪 Sweden: 62 / 82.7,
* 🇻🇳 Vietnam: 60.5 / 76.7,
* 🇨🇳 China: 60 / 77.1,
* 🇮🇳 India: 60 / 69.7,
* 🇸🇦 Saudi Arabia: 60 / 75.7,
* 🇿🇦 South Africa: 60 / 64.1,
* 🇰🇷 South Korea: 60 / 83.3,
* 🇹🇷 Turkey: 60 / 77.4,
* 🇧🇩 Bangladesh: 59 / 72.6,
* 🇮🇩 Indonesia: 58 / 71.7",
[{2023-08-25 retrieved} https://twitter.com/stats_feed/status/1695065829476336029]

name::
* McsEngl.wrkr'ageRetirement,

info-resource of wrkr

name::
* McsEngl.wrkr'Infrsc,

addressWpg::
*

structure of wrkr

name::
* McsEngl.wrkr'structure,

description::
*

DOING of wrkr

name::
* McsEngl.wrkr'doing,

description::
*

working of wrkr

description::
· dngWorking is the-doing of a-worker to produce a-satisfier.

· stxEngl: [[My brother] [the research associate]] _stxVrb:{works} _stxSpace:[(at) a large polling firm].
· stxEngl: [We] _stxVrb:{work} _stxManner:[closely] _stxWithwhom:[(with) the careers officers] _stxSpace:[in schools]. [HarperCollins]
· stxEngl: [Ian] _stxVrb:{will be working} _stxObj:[(on) the computer system] _stxTime:[(for) the next two weeks].
· stxEngl: [Both my grandfather and my father] _stxVrb:{worked} _stxSpace:[(in) the steel plant].
· stxEngl: [He] _stxVrb:{has worked} _stxProffesion:[(as) a diplomat] _stxSpace:[in the US, Sudan and Saudi Arabia]. [HarperCollins]
· stxEngl: [She] (has worked) _stxManner:[hard] _stxDoing:[(at) her marriage]. [HarperCollins]

=== gōngzuò-工作:
· stxZhon: 他们 工作 了。 :: _stxSbj:[Tāmen] _stxVrb:{gōngzuò le}. != They (already) work. (This expression emphasizes that they're not students anymore, and have already entered the workforce.)

name::
* McsEngl.dngWorking!=human-doing.working,
* McsEngl.dngWorkingHmn!⇒dngWorking,
* McsEngl.work!⇒dngWorking,
* McsEngl.wrkr'att001-working!⇒dngWorking,
* McsEngl.wrkr'working!⇒dngWorking,
* McsEngl.to-work!~verbEnglA1:work--s-ed-ing-ed!=dngWorking,
* McsEngl.work-of-worker!⇒dngWorking,
* McsEngl.working!⇒dngWorking,
* McsEngl.working-of-worker!⇒dngWorking,
* McsEngl.workingHmn!⇒dngWorking,
====== langoChinese:
* McsZhon.gōngzuò-工作!=dngWorking,
* McsZhon.工作-gōngzuò!=dngWorking,
====== langoGreek:
* McsEngl.verbElln.εργάζομαι!=dngWorking,
* McsElln.εργάζομαι!~verbElln!=dngWorking,
* McsElln.εργασία!η!=dngWorking,

days-of-work of dngWorking

description::
">annual days of work:
The number of annual work days can vary depending on several factors, including:
* **Location:** Different countries have different statutory minimums for paid annual leave. For example, in the United Kingdom, full-time employees are entitled to at least 28 days of paid annual leave, while in the United States, there is no federal minimum, and many employees receive no paid leave at all.
* **Industry:** Some industries, such as education and healthcare, typically have shorter work weeks and more paid holidays than others.
* **Company:** Some companies offer more generous vacation policies than others.
* **Individual contract:** An employee's individual employment contract may specify a different number of annual work days than the statutory minimum.
* **Work schedule:** Some employees work full-time, while others work part-time. Part-time employees will typically have fewer work days per year than full-time employees.

Taking all of these factors into account, it is difficult to give a definitive answer to the question of how many annual work days there are. However, here are some general estimates:
* **In the United States, the average full-time employee works 2,080 hours per year, which is equivalent to 260 work days.** This number does not include paid holidays, sick leave, or other forms of paid time off.
* **In the European Union, the average full-time employee works 1,767 hours per year, which is equivalent to 221 work days.** This number includes paid holidays, but not sick leave or other forms of paid time off.
It is important to note that these are just averages, and the actual number of work days for any individual employee will vary depending on the factors mentioned above."
[{2024-02-11 retrieved} https://gemini.google.com/app/10903e48fec37e26]

name::
* McsEngl.days-of-work,
* McsEngl.dngWorking'days-of-work,
* McsEngl.wrkr'att018-days-of-work,
* McsEngl.wrkr'days-of-work,

hours-of-work of dngWorking

description::
"Average annual hours worked:
* 🇲🇽Mexico — 2,128
* 🇳🇬Nigeria — 2,124
* 🇨🇷Costa Rica — 2,073
* 🇨🇴Colombia — 1,964
* 🇨🇱Chile — 1,916
* 🇰🇷South Korea — 1,910
* 🇲🇹Malta — 1,882
* 🇷🇺Russia — 1,874
* 🇬🇷Greece — 1,872
* 🇷🇴Romania — 1,838
* 🇭🇷Croatia — 1,835
* 🇵🇱Poland — 1,830
* 🇺🇸United States — 1,791
* 🇮🇪Ireland — 1,775
* 🇪🇪Estonia — 1,767
* 🇨🇿Czech Republic — 1,753
* 🇮🇱Israel — 1,753
* 🇨🇾Cyprus — 1,745
* 🇳🇿New Zealand — 1,730
* 🇭🇺Hungary — 1,697
* 🇦🇺Australia — 1,694
* 🇨🇦Canada — 1,685
* 🇮🇹Italy — 1,669
* 🇮🇳India — 1,660
* 🇮🇩Indonesia — 1,660
* 🇵🇹Portugal — 1,649
* 🇪🇸Spain — 1,641
* 🇱🇹Lithuania — 1,620
* 🇧🇬Bulgaria — 1,619
* 🇯🇵Japan — 1,607
* 🇱🇻Latvia — 1,601
* 🇸🇮Slovenia — 1,596
* 🇸🇰Slovakia — 1,583
* 🇹🇷Türkiye — 1,572
* 🇨🇭Switzerland — 1,533
* 🇫🇮Finland — 1,518
* 🇿🇦South Africa — 1,513
* 🇸🇦Saudi Arabia — 1,513
* 🇬🇧United Kingdom — 1,497
* 🇧🇪Belgium — 1,493
* 🇫🇷France — 1,490
* 🇧🇷Brazil — 1,481
* 🇸🇪Sweden — 1,444
* 🇦🇹Austria — 1,442
* 🇮🇸Iceland — 1,433
* 🇳🇴Norway — 1,427
* 🇳🇱Netherlands — 1,416
* 🇱🇺Luxembourg — 1,382
* 🇩🇰Denmark — 1,363
* 🇩🇪Germany — 1,349"
[{2023-09-20 retrieved} https://twitter.com/stats_feed/status/1704513129651019971]

name::
* McsEngl.dngWorking'hours-of-work,
* McsEngl.wrkr'att15-hours-of-work,
* McsEngl.wrkr'hours-of-work,
* McsEngl.hours-of-work--of-worker,

dngWorking.SPECIFIC

description::
* economic-dngWorking,
* economicNo-dngWorking,
===
* average-dngWorking,
* real-dngWorking,
===

name::
* McsEngl.dngWorking.specific,

dngWorking.economic

description::
· producer ≠ consumer.
· producer = consumer, for its needs (wants important for a-society).

name::
* McsEngl.dngEconwork!=dngWorking.economic,
* McsEngl.dngWorking.economic!⇒dngEconwork,
* McsEngl.economic-work!⇒dngEconwork,
* McsEngl.wrkr'att017-economic-work!⇒dngEconwork,
====== langoGreek:
* McsElln.οικονομική-εργασία!η!=dngEconwork,

dngWorking.economicNo

description::
· producer = consumer, NOT for its needs (wants importans for a-society).

name::
* McsEngl.dngEconworkNo!=dngWorking.economicNo,
* McsEngl.dngWorking.economicNo!⇒dngEconworkNo,
* McsEngl.economicNo-dngWorking!⇒dngEconworkNo,
* McsEngl.non-economic-dngWorking!⇒dngEconworkNo,
* McsEngl.personal-dngWorking!⇒dngEconworkNo,
* McsEngl.wrkr'att016-non-economic-dngWorking!⇒dngEconworkNo,
====== langoGreek:
* McsElln.μη-οικονομική-εργασία!η!=dngEconworkNo,
* McsElln.προσωπική-εργασία!η!=dngEconworkNo,

job of wrkr

description::
· job is a-specific working in an-organization performed by ONE worker with or without compensation.
· a-human can-have more than one jobs or nothing.

· stxZhon: _stxSbj:[我] _stxVrb:{正在找} _stxObj:[工作]。 Wǒ zhèngzài zhǎo gōngzuò. != [I] {am looking for} [a job].

name::
* McsEngl.Hmnjob!⇒job,
* McsEngl.human'06_job!⇒job,
* McsEngl.human'att012-job!⇒job,
* McsEngl.human'has-occupation!⇒job,
* McsEngl.human'job-att012!⇒job,
* McsEngl.job-of-human-att012!⇒job,
* McsEngl.job,
* McsEngl.occupation!⇒job,
* McsEngl.position-of-worker!⇒job,
* McsEngl.work-position!⇒job,
* McsEngl.wrkr'att006-job!⇒job,
* McsEngl.wrkr'job!⇒job,
====== langoChinese:
* McsZhon.gōngzuò-工作!=job,
* McsZhon.工作-gōngzuò!=job,
====== langoGreek:
* McsElln.θέση-εργασίας!=job,

01-title of job

description::
· A job title is a name that describes someone’s job or position 1. It is a brief description of the position held by the employee and gives an idea about the position in the organizational hierarchy.

name::
* McsEngl.job'01-title,
* McsEngl.job'title,
* McsEngl.human'att085-title-of-job,
* McsEngl.human'title-of-job,
* McsEngl.job'title,

02-qualification of job

description::
* theoritical and practical education.
* experience,
* diploma,
* Skills and experience required: The specific skills and experience needed to perform the job duties.
* Role and Responsibilities: Specific tasks and duties associated with the job.

name::
* McsEngl.job'02-qualification,
* McsEngl.job'att006-qualification,
* McsEngl.job'qualification,

03-compensation of job

description::
· a-satisfier given to worker in recognition of his work.
· it could-be nothing.
* Base Salary: The fixed amount of money paid to an employee, often expressed as an annual figure.
* Bonuses and Commissions: Additional financial incentives based on performance or achievements.
* Stock Options or Equity: Especially relevant in startups or tech companies, where employees are offered a stake in the company.
* Health Insurance: Coverage for medical expenses, which can vary greatly in terms of what’s covered and the level of coverage.
* Retirement Plans: 401(k), pensions, and other retirement savings plans, often with employer matching.
* Paid Time Off: Includes vacation days, sick leave, and personal days.

name::
* McsEngl.job'03-compensation,
* McsEngl.job'att003-compensation,
* McsEngl.job'compensation,

security of job

description::
* Contract Type: Permanent, temporary, or contract-based employment.
* Industry Stability: Some industries are more prone to fluctuations and economic downturns than others.
* Company Health: Financial stability and growth prospects of the employer.

name::
* McsEngl.job'att011-security,
* McsEngl.job'security,
* McsEngl.security-of-job,

working-hours of job

description::
* Full-Time vs. Part-Time: Determined by the number of hours worked per week.
* Flexible Hours: The possibility to adjust working hours according to personal needs.

name::
* McsEngl.job'att010-working-hours,
* McsEngl.job'working-hours,
* McsEngl.working-hours--of-job,

work-life of job

description::
* Stress Level: The degree of mental or emotional strain associated with the job.
* Overtime Expectations: The expectation or requirement to work beyond standard hours.
* Autonomy and Creativity: The degree of freedom and creativity allowed in the role.
* Impact and Fulfillment: The extent to which the job provides a sense of purpose or impact.
* Company Culture: The values, behaviors, and practices within the organization.
* Team Dynamics: The nature of interaction and collaboration among team members.
* Physical Workspace: Office layout, ergonomics, and amenities.
* Autonomy and Creativity: The degree of freedom and creativity allowed in the role.
* Impact and Fulfillment: The extent to which the job provides a sense of purpose or impact.
* Company Policies: Commitment to diversity and inclusive practices.
* Workforce Diversity: Representation of different groups within the organization.

name::
* McsEngl.job'att009-work-life,
* McsEngl.job'work-life,
* McsEngl.work-life--of-job,

organization of job

description::
· the-organization where the-job is done.
· a-satisfier-ozn, a-gvc-ozn or a-household.

name::
* McsEngl.job'organization,
* McsEngl.human'att086-organization-of-work,
* McsEngl.human'organization-of-work,
* McsEngl.human'works-for,
* McsEngl.job'organization,
* McsEngl.job'att001-organization,
* McsEngl.job'organization,

workplace of job

description::
· the-location where the-job is done.

name::
* McsEngl.Hmnplace.work,
* McsEngl.human'att083-work-place,
* McsEngl.human'work-place,
* McsEngl.job'att008-workplace,
* McsEngl.job'location,
* McsEngl.job'organization,
* McsEngl.job'workplace,
* McsEngl.workplace-of-job,

commute-time of job

description::
· The time and ease of travel to and from work.

name::
* McsEngl.commute-time--of-job,
* McsEngl.job'att007-commute-time,
* McsEngl.job'commute-time,

safety of job

description::
· accident possibilities.

name::
* McsEngl.job'safety,
* McsEngl.job'att004-safety,
* McsEngl.job'safety,

evaluation of job

description::
· cons and pros.

name::
* McsEngl.job'evaluation,
* McsEngl.job'att005-evaluation,
* McsEngl.job'evaluation,

sponsor of job

description::
"A person or organization that supports a thing through a pledge, promise, or financial contribution. e.g. a sponsor of a Medical Study or a corporate sponsor of an event."
[{2021-01-21} https://synagonism.net/dirMcs/dirStn/McsStn000023.last.html#idScmosponsor]

name::
* McsEngl.job'sponsor,
* McsEngl.human'att087-sponsor,
* McsEngl.human'sponsor,

funder of job

description::
"A person or organization that supports (sponsors) something through some kind of financial contribution."
[{2021-01-21} https://synagonism.net/dirMcs/dirStn/McsStn000023.last.html#idScmofunder]

name::
* McsEngl.human'funder,
* McsEngl.job'funder,

hard-soft-attribute of job

description::
">employment job attributes:
Employment job attributes, also known as job characteristics, are the factors that make a job appealing or unattractive to potential employees. These attributes can be categorized into two main groups:

**Hard attributes** are objective and quantifiable qualities related to the job itself, such as:
* **Salary:** The amount of money paid for the job.
* **Benefits:** The non-monetary rewards offered by the employer, such as health insurance, retirement savings plans, and paid time off.
* **Job security:** The likelihood of the job being eliminated or downsized.
* **Work-life balance:** The ability to balance work demands with personal life commitments.
* **Opportunities for advancement:** The potential for promotion and career growth within the company.
* **Training and development:** The opportunities for employees to learn new skills and advance their careers.
* **Physical demands:** The physical exertion required for the job.
* **Skills and experience required:** The specific skills and experience needed to perform the job duties.

**Soft attributes** are subjective and qualitative qualities related to the work environment and company culture, such as:
* **Company culture:** The overall atmosphere and values of the company.
* **Management style:** The leadership approach of the managers and supervisors.
* **Teamwork and collaboration:** The opportunities to work with others and contribute to a team.
* **Problem-solving and decision-making:** The ability to identify and resolve problems and make sound decisions.
* **Creativity and innovation:** The freedom to think outside the box and come up with new ideas.
* **Meaningful work:** The feeling that the job makes a difference and contributes to something worthwhile.
* **Company values:** The ethical principles and social responsibility initiatives of the company.

Job attributes play a crucial role in attracting and retaining qualified employees. When job seekers are considering different job opportunities, they often weigh the hard and soft attributes to determine which job is the best fit for them. Employers can also use job attributes to assess the overall attractiveness of their jobs and make adjustments to improve employee satisfaction and retention.
Here's a summary table of the key differences between hard and soft job attributes:
| Feature | Hard Attributes | Soft Attributes |
| Nature | Objective and quantifiable | Subjective and qualitative |
| Focus | Job duties and responsibilities | Work environment, company culture, and values |
| Measurement | Easily quantifiable metrics | More difficult to quantify |
| Importance | Essential for understanding the job's demands | Critical for assessing employee satisfaction and overall job fit |"
[{2024-01-25 retrieved} https://bard.google.com/chat/6213801919cd9565]

"job attributes:
When considering different types of jobs, there are various attributes that can influence your decision. These attributes can significantly affect job satisfaction, work-life balance, and overall career development. Here's a breakdown of some key job attributes:
### 1. Salary and Compensation
- **Base Salary**: The fixed amount of money paid to an employee, often expressed as an annual figure.
- **Bonuses and Commissions**: Additional financial incentives based on performance or achievements.
- **Stock Options or Equity**: Especially relevant in startups or tech companies, where employees are offered a stake in the company.
### 2. Benefits
- **Health Insurance**: Coverage for medical expenses, which can vary greatly in terms of what’s covered and the level of coverage.
- **Retirement Plans**: 401(k), pensions, and other retirement savings plans, often with employer matching.
- **Paid Time Off**: Includes vacation days, sick leave, and personal days.
### 3. Work Hours and Flexibility
- **Full-Time vs. Part-Time**: Determined by the number of hours worked per week.
- **Flexible Hours**: The possibility to adjust working hours according to personal needs.
- **Remote Work Options**: The ability to work from home or other locations outside of a traditional office.
### 4. Job Security and Stability
- **Contract Type**: Permanent, temporary, or contract-based employment.
- **Industry Stability**: Some industries are more prone to fluctuations and economic downturns than others.
- **Company Health**: Financial stability and growth prospects of the employer.
### 5. Career Growth and Development
- **Promotion Opportunities**: Potential for upward mobility within the organization.
- **Professional Development**: Access to training, conferences, and further education.
- **Mentorship and Networking Opportunities**: Chances to connect with industry professionals and leaders.
### 6. Work Environment and Culture
- **Company Culture**: The values, behaviors, and practices within the organization.
- **Team Dynamics**: The nature of interaction and collaboration among team members.
- **Physical Workspace**: Office layout, ergonomics, and amenities.
### 7. Job Content and Satisfaction
- **Role and Responsibilities**: Specific tasks and duties associated with the job.
- **Autonomy and Creativity**: The degree of freedom and creativity allowed in the role.
- **Impact and Fulfillment**: The extent to which the job provides a sense of purpose or impact.
### 8. Location and Commute
- **Geographical Location**: Where the job is situated, which can affect lifestyle and living costs.
- **Commute Time**: The time and ease of travel to and from work.
### 9. Work-Life Balance
- **Overtime Expectations**: The expectation or requirement to work beyond standard hours.
- **Stress Level**: The degree of mental or emotional strain associated with the job.
### 10. Diversity and Inclusion
- **Company Policies**: Commitment to diversity and inclusive practices.
- **Workforce Diversity**: Representation of different groups within the organization.
Each individual may prioritize these attributes differently based on their personal and professional goals, values, and lifestyle preferences. It's important to evaluate these factors when considering job opportunities to find the best fit for your career and life."
[{2024-01-25 retrieved} https://chat.openai.com/c/e47f8cbe-6a5e-4278-b85c-61c28cfc82e0]

name::
* McsEngl.job'hard-soft-attribute,
* McsEngl.job'soft-hard-attribute,

info-resource of job

description::
* https://www.weforum.org/reports/the-future-of-jobs-report-2020/in-full/executive-summary,

name::
* McsEngl.job'Infrsc,

04_searching for job

description::
· doings that help find a-job.

name::
* McsEngl.job'04_searching!⇒job'searching,
* McsEngl.job'att002-searching!⇒job'searching,
* McsEngl.job'finding!⇒job'searching,
* McsEngl.job'searching,
* McsEngl.searching-for-job!⇒job'searching,
====== langoGreek:
* McsElln.εύρεση-εργασίας!=job'searching,

info-resource of job'searching

description::
* https://ec.europa.eu/eures/public/el/homepage,
* http://www.oaed.gr/,
* https://chrono.tech/blog/where-to-find-blockchain-jobs,

name::
* McsEngl.job'searching'resource,

job.SPECIFIC

description::
* telejob,
* telejobNo,
===
* fulltime-job,
* fulltimeNo-job,
===
* long-time-job,
* long-timeNo-job,
===
* blockchain-job,

name::
* McsEngl.job.specific,

job.ISCO-classification

description::
"The International standard classification of occupations, abbreviated as ISCO, is an international classification under the responsibility of the International Labour Organization (ILO) for organising jobs into a clearly defined set of groups according to the tasks and duties undertaken in the job.
ISCO is intended both for use in compiling statistics and for client-oriented uses such as the recruitment of workers through employment offices, the management of migration of workers between countries and the development of vocational training programmes and guidance.
The first ISCO version, known as ISCO-58, was adopted in 1957 by the Ninth International Conference of Labour Statisticians; subsequent versions were ISCO-68 (Eleventh International Conference of Labour Statisticians, 1966), ISCO-88 (Fourteenth International Conference of Labour Statisticians, 1987) and the fairly recent ISCO-08, adopted in December 2007."
[{2023-09-22 retrieved} https://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/statistics-explained/index.php?title=Glossary:International_standard_classification_of_occupations_(ISCO)]

name::
* McsEngl.ISCO!=international-standard-classification-of-occupations,
* McsEngl.job.006-ISCO-classification,
* McsEngl.job.ISCO-classification,

job.remote-001

description::
"Telecommuting, also called telework, teleworking, working from home (WFH[1] - the most common term in the UK), mobile work, remote job, remote work, and flexible workplace,[2][3] is a work arrangement in which employees do not commute or travel (e.g. by bus, bicycle or car, etc.) to a central place of work, such as an office building, warehouse, or store. Telecommuting came into prominence in the 1970s to describe work-related substitutions of telecommunication and related information technologies for travel.[4] Teleworkers in the 21st century often use mobile telecommunications technology such as a Wi-Fi-equipped laptop or tablet computers and smartphones to work from coffee shops; others may use a desktop computer and a landline phone at their home. According to a Reuters poll, approximately "one in five workers around the globe, particularly employees in the Middle East, Latin America and Asia, telecommute frequently and nearly 10 percent work from home every day."[5] In the 2000s, annual leave or vacation in some organizations was seen as absence from the workplace rather than ceasing work, and some office employees used telework to continue to check work e-mails while on vacation.[citation needed]"
[{2020-09-18} https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Telecommuting]

name::
* McsEngl.job.001-remote!⇒jobRemote,
* McsEngl.job.remote!⇒jobRemote,
* McsEngl.jobRemote,
* McsEngl.remote-job!⇒jobRemote,
* McsEngl.telecommuting!⇒jobRemote,
* McsEngl.telejob!⇒jobRemote,

info-resource of jobRemote

description::
* https://angel.co,
* https://authenticjobs.com,
* https://fiverr.com,
* https://flexjobs.com,
* https://freelancer.in,
* https://himalayas.app,
* https://in.indeed.com,
* https://jobboardsearch.com,
* https://jsremotely.com, javascript jobs,
* https://justremote.co,
* https://laborx.com, crypto jobs,
* https://linkedin.com,
* https://odeskwork.com,
* https://outsourcely.com,
* https://powertofly.com,
* https://problogger.com,
* https://remote.co,
* https://remotefront io,
* https://remoteok.io,
* https://remotive.io,
* https://skipthedrive.com,
* https://tryremotely.com,
* https://upwork.com,
* https://virtualvocations.com,
* https://wellfound com,
* https://weworkremotely.com,
* https://workingnomads.co,

* https://lp.buffer.com/state-of-remote-work-2020,

name::
* McsEngl.jobRemote'Infrsc,

jobRemote.SPECIFIC

description::
"In May[2020], 42% of Americans aged 20-64 earning more than $20,000 were working from home full-time, according to a Stanford University survey – compared to just 2% working full-time from home before the pandemic."
[{2020-10-25} https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2020/10/mental-health-remote-working-conversations-virtual]

name::
* McsEngl.jobRemote.specific,

job.remoteNo-002

description::
·

name::
* McsEngl.job.002-remoteNo!⇒jobRemoteNo,
* McsEngl.job.remoteNo!⇒jobRemoteNo,
* McsEngl.jobRemoteNo,

job.profession-004

description::
· involves prolonged training and/or formal qualifications.
===
"(n) profession (an occupation requiring special education (especially in the liberal arts or sciences))"
[{2022-01-16 retrieved} http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=profession]

=== zhíyè-职业!=profession:
· stxZhon: 他 的 职业 是 教师。 :: _stxSbj:[Tā(de)zhíyè] _stxVrb:{shì} _stxSbjc:[jiàoshī]。 != [his profession] {is} [teacher].

name::
* McsEngl.job.004-profession,
* McsEngl.job.profession,
* McsEngl.profession,
====== langoChinese:
* McsZhon.zhíyè-职业!=profession,
* McsZhon.职业-zhíyè!=profession,
====== langoGreek:
* McsElln.επάγγελμα!το!=profession,

relation-to-job of profession

description::
"job vs profession
The terms "job" and "profession" are often used interchangeably, but there is a subtle difference between the two. A job is a specific position that you hold, while a profession is a broader field of work that requires specialized knowledge and skills.
Here are some of the key differences between jobs and professions:
* Education and training: Jobs typically require less education and training than professions. For example, a cashier job may only require a high school diploma, while a lawyer job requires a law degree.
* Entry-level positions: Jobs often have entry-level positions that do not require much experience. Professions, on the other hand, typically have more advanced positions that require years of experience.
* Specialization: Jobs are often more specialized than professions. For example, a marketing associate job may only focus on one aspect of marketing, such as social media marketing. A profession, such as marketing, is broader and encompasses many different types of marketing positions.
* Regulation: Professions are often regulated by the government. This means that there are specific requirements that you must meet in order to practice a profession, such as obtaining a license or certification. Jobs are not typically regulated.
* Salary and benefits: Jobs typically have lower salaries and benefits than professions. This is because professions require more education and training, and they are often in higher demand.
Here are some examples of jobs and professions:
* Jobs: Cashier, waiter/waitress, retail salesperson, customer service representative
* Professions: Lawyer, doctor, engineer, accountant, teacher
Ultimately, the difference between a job and a profession is a matter of degree. Some jobs, such as those in the medical field, require a high level of education and training, and they may be considered professions. Other jobs, such as those in the retail industry, may have less education and training requirements, and they would not be considered professions.
The best way to choose the right career for you is to consider your interests, skills, and values. If you are interested in a career that requires a high level of education and training, then a profession may be a good fit for you. If you are looking for a career that is more flexible and less demanding, then a job may be a better option."
[{2023-08-30 retrieved} https://bard.google.com/]

name::
* McsEngl.job'relation-to-profession,
* McsEngl.profession'relation-to-job,

job.professionNo-005

description::
· not profession.

">occupation vs profession:
The terms "occupation" and "profession" are often used interchangeably, but they have distinct meanings and implications.
1. **Occupation**: This is a broad term that refers to any type of job or series of jobs that a person holds over their working life. An occupation can be anything from manual labor to high-level management. It generally encompasses any activity people are engaged in to earn a living.
2. **Profession**: A profession usually refers to a type of job that requires specialized education, training, and skills. Professions often also have formal qualifications and association with a professional body. Examples include doctors, lawyers, and architects. These roles typically require a higher level of education and adhere to strict codes of conduct.
In essence, while all professions can be considered occupations, not all occupations meet the criteria to be considered professions. A profession typically demands a specific kind of training and usually involves commitment to a specific field of study, adherence to a moral code, and often has a higher status or public regard."
[{2024-04-21 retrieved} https://chat.openai.com/c/ca80e786-d682-4947-b13b-18bc2101bcb0]

name::
* McsEngl.job.005-professionNo,
* McsEngl.job.professionNo,
* McsEngl.occupation-vs-profession,
* McsEngl.professionNo,

evoluting of wrkr

name::
* McsEngl.evoluting-of-worker,
* McsEngl.wrkr'evoluting,

{2020-07-12}::
=== McsHitp-creation:
· creation of current concept.

WHOLE-PART-TREE of wrkr

name::
* McsEngl.wrkr'whole-part-tree,

whole-tree-of-worker::
* producing-system,
* ... Sympan.

part-tree-of-worker::
*

GENERIC-SPECIFIC-TREE of wrkr

name::
* McsEngl.wrkr'generic-specific-tree,

generic-tree-of-worker::
* producer-of-economy,
* ... entity.

specific-tree-of-worker::
* counselor-worker,
* employed-worker,
* employedNo-worker,
* employee-worker,
* employer-worker,
* homemaker-worker,
* homemakerNo-worker,
* mind-worker,
* mindNo-worker,
* professional-worker,
* professionalNo-worker,
* therapist-worker,

* McsEngl.wrkr.specific,

wrkr.spec-div.employment

description::
·

name::
* McsEngl.wrkr.spec-div.employment,

wrkr.employed-005

description::
· wrkrEmployed is a-worker who is working for self or other.

name::
* McsEngl.employed-worker!⇒wrkrEmployed,
* McsEngl.wrkrEmployed,
* McsEngl.wrkr.005-employed!⇒wrkrEmployed,
* McsEngl.wrkr.employed!⇒wrkrEmployed,

specific-tree-of-wrkrEmployed::
* worker.employed.self,
* worker.employed.other,

wrkr.employed.employee-002

description::
· employee is a-worker under a-contract-of-employment for another human or organization.
===
"An individual who works part-time or full-time under a contract of employment, whether oral or written, express or implied, and has recognized rights and duties. Also called worker."
[{2020-08-11} http://www.businessdictionary.com/definition/employee.html]

name::
* McsEngl.employee!⇒wrkrEmployee,
* McsEngl.wrkrEmployee,
* McsEngl.wrkr.002-employee!⇒wrkrEmployee,
* McsEngl.wrkr.employed.employee!⇒wrkrEmployee,
* McsEngl.wrkr.employee!⇒wrkrEmployee,
====== langoGreek:
* McsElln.απασχολούμενος!=wrkrEmployee,

contract-of-employment of wrkrEmployee

description::
"Oral or written, express or implied, agreement specifying terms and conditions under which a person consents to perform certain duties as directed and controlled by an employer in return for an agreed upon wage or salary. Whether stated or not in the contract, both the employee and the employer owe the duty of mutual confidence and trust, and to make only lawful and reasonable demands on each other. Every employee is under the obligation to carry assigned duties, or the employer's instructions to the best of his or her abilities. The employer is under the obligation to protect the employee from harm or injury, and make fair compensation for any loss or damage resulting from any job-related accident.
Also called contract of service, it generally details the conditions under which it can be lawfully terminated by either party, and the correct procedure to be followed in its termination. See also conditions of employment and implied contract of employment.
[{2020-08-11} http://www.businessdictionary.com/definition/contract-of-employment.html]

name::
* McsEngl.contract-of-employment,
* McsEngl.contract-of-service,
* McsEngl.wrkrEmployee'contract-of-employment,
* McsEngl.wrkrEmployer'contract-of-employment,

wrkr.employed.employeeNo-003

description::
· employeeNo-worker is a-worker who is not employee.

name::
* McsEngl.wrkr.003-self-employed!⇒wrkrEmployeeNo,
* McsEngl.wrkr.employed.self-employed!⇒wrkrEmployeeNo,
* McsEngl.wrkr.self-employed!⇒wrkrEmployeeNo,
* McsEngl.wrkrEmployeeNo,
* McsEngl.wrkrSelfemployed!⇒wrkrEmployeeNo,
* McsEngl.self-employed-worker!⇒wrkrEmployeeNo,

wrkr.employeeNo.employer-001

description::
· employer is an-employeeNo who uses other workers|employees to do the-job under a-contract-of-employment.
===
"In an employer-employee relationship, the payer is considered an employer and the worker an employee."
[{2020-08-11} https://www.canada.ca/en/revenue-agency/services/forms-publications/publications/rc4110/employee-self-employed.html]

name::
* McsEngl.employer!⇒wrkrEmployer,
* McsEngl.wrkrEmployer,
* McsEngl.wrkr.001-employer!⇒wrkrEmployer,
* McsEngl.wrkr.employed.self.employer!⇒wrkrEmployer,
* McsEngl.wrkr.employer!⇒wrkrEmployer,
====== langoGreek:
* McsElln.εργοδότης!=wrkrEmployer,

wrkr.employeeNo.employerNo-017

description::
· employerNo is employeeNo who does-not-uses other workers to create his satisfiers.
· employerNo sells the created satisfiers by himself.

name::
* McsEngl.SoD-Staff-on-Demand!⇒wrkrFreelancer,
* McsEngl.employerNo!⇒wrkrFreelancer,
* McsEngl.freelancer!⇒wrkrFreelancer,
* McsEngl.wrkr.017-employerNo!⇒wrkrFreelancer,
* McsEngl.wrkr.employeeNo.employerNo!⇒wrkrFreelancer,
* McsEngl.wrkr.employerNo!⇒wrkrFreelancer,
* McsEngl.wrkrEmployerNo!⇒wrkrFreelancer,
* McsEngl.wrkrFreelancer,

descriptionLong::
· "Freelance (sometimes spelled free-lance or free lance),[1] freelancer, or freelance worker, are terms commonly used for a person who is self-employed and not necessarily committed to a particular employer long-term. Freelance workers are sometimes represented by a company or a temporary agency that resells freelance labor to clients; others work independently or use professional associations or websites to get work.
While the term independent contractor would be used in a different register of English to designate the tax and employment classes of this type of worker, the term "freelancing" is most common in culture and creative industries, and use of this term may indicate participation therein.[2]
Fields, professions, and industries where freelancing is predominant include: music, writing, acting, computer programming, web design, graphic design, translating and illustrating, film and video production, and other forms of piece work that some cultural theorists consider central to the cognitive-cultural economy.[3]"
[{2023-06-23 retrieved} https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Freelancer]

contract-for-service of wrkrFreelancer

description::
· the-contract to offer work to another entity.

name::
* McsEngl.contract-for-service,
* McsEngl.wrkrSelfemployed'contract-for-service,

info-resource of wrkrFreelancer

description::
* {2023-06-22} https://www.diamandis.com/blog/staff-on-demand-exo,
* https://laborx.com/,
* https://www.upwork.com/,

name::
* McsEngl.wrkrFreelancer'Infrsc,

wrkr.employed.child-021

description::
"economically active children: Children involved in economic activity for at least one hour in the reference week of the survey."
[{2021-02-24} https://wolframalpha.com]

name::
* McsEngl.economically-active-child//economy,
* McsEngl.wrkr.021-child,
* McsEngl.wrkr.child,
* McsEngl.wrkrEmployed.child,

wrkr.employedNo-006

description::
"Unemployment, according to the OECD (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development), if persons above a specified age (usually 15)[2] not being in paid employment or self-employment but currently available for work during the reference period.[3]"
[{2020-10-10} https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unemployment]

name::
* McsEngl.employedNo-worker!⇒wrkrEmployedNo,
* McsEngl.unemployed-worker!⇒wrkrEmployedNo,
* McsEngl.wrkrEmployedNo,
* McsEngl.wrkr.006-employedNo!⇒wrkrEmployedNo,
* McsEngl.wrkr.employedNo!⇒wrkrEmployedNo,

wrkrEmployedNo.aggregate

description::
"unemployment rate: The share of the labor force that is without work but available for and seeking employment. Definitions of labor force and unemployment differ by country."

name::
* McsEngl.unemployment//economy,
* McsEngl.wrkrEmployedNo.aggregate!⇒unemployment,

payment of unemployment

description::
"Unemployment benefits, also called unemployment insurance, unemployment payment, unemployment compensation, or simply unemployment, are payments made by authorized bodies to unemployed people. In the United States, benefits are funded by a compulsory governmental insurance system, not taxes on individual citizens. Depending on the jurisdiction and the status of the person, those sums may be small, covering only basic needs, or may compensate the lost time proportionally to the previous earned salary.
Unemployment benefits are generally given only to those registering as becoming unemployed through no fault of their own, and often on conditions ensuring that they seek work.
In British English, unemployment benefits are also colloquially referred to as "the dole";[1][2] receiving benefits is informally called "being on the dole".[3] "Dole" here is an archaic expression meaning "one's allotted portion", from the synonymous Old English word dāl.[4]"
[{2024-04-20 retrieved} https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unemployment_benefits]

name::
* McsEngl.unemployment'payment,
* McsEngl.unemployment'benefit,
* McsEngl.unemployment'compensation,
* McsEngl.unemployment'insurance,

unemployment.long-term

description::
"long-term unemployment rate: Long-term unemployment refers to the number of people with continuous periods of unemployment extending for a year or longer."

name::
* McsEngl.unemployment.long-term,

unemployment.China

description::
* {2024}
In January 2024, the unemployment rate in China increased to 5.20 percent, up from 5.10 percent in December 2023【https://www.piie.com/blogs/realtime-economics/five-big-uncertainties-facing-chinese-economy-2024】. This rise is part of a broader context where, despite the Chinese economy beginning to recover from the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic and associated policies, it faces significant challenges. These challenges include flat private investment, flagging consumer confidence, and notably high youth unemployment【3:1†source】. The youth unemployment rate, in particular, has become a pressing issue, reaching a high of 21.3%. This increase highlights a challenging job market for young people in China, with significant implications for the country's future economic growth and stability【https://www.thomsonreuters.com/en-us/posts/global-economy/geopolitical-economic-outlook-2024-china-global-security/】.
[{2024-03-11 retrieved} https://chat.openai.com/c/eedcba54-78ac-4d97-b101-03d9ddb9602c]

name::
* McsEngl.Chnaunemployment!=unemployment-in-China,
* McsEngl.unemployment.China!⇒Chnaunemployment,

wrkrEmployedNo.jobseeker

description::
· jobseeker is a-wrkrEmployedNo who is-searching for a-job.

name::
* McsEngl.wrkr.018-jobseeker!⇒wrkrJobseeker,
* McsEngl.wrkr.employedNo.jobseeker!⇒wrkrJobseeker,
* McsEngl.wrkr.jobseeker!⇒wrkrJobseeker,
* McsEngl.jobseeker!⇒wrkrJobseeker,
* McsEngl.wrkrJobseeker,

wrkrEmployedNo.jobseekerNo

description::
· jobseeker is a-wrkrEmployedNo who is-NOT-searching for a-job.

name::
* McsEngl.wrkr.019-jobseekerNo!⇒wrkrJobseekerNo,
* McsEngl.wrkr.employedNo.jobseekerNo!⇒wrkrJobseekerNo,
* McsEngl.wrkr.jobseekerNo!⇒wrkrJobseekerNo,
* McsEngl.jobseekerNo!⇒wrkrJobseekerNo,
* McsEngl.wrkrJobseekerNo,

wrkr.spec-div.skill

description::
·

name::
* McsEngl.wrkr.spec-div.skill,

wrkr.skill.skilled-014

description::
·

name::
* McsEngl.skilled-worker!⇒wrkrSkilled,
* McsEngl.wrkrSkilled,
* McsEngl.wrkr.014-skilled!⇒wrkrSkilled,
* McsEngl.wrkr.skill.skilled!⇒wrkrSkilled,
* McsEngl.wrkr.skilled!⇒wrkrSkilled,

wrkr.skill.skilledNo-015

description::
·

name::
* McsEngl.skilledNo-worker!⇒wrkrSkilledNo,
* McsEngl.unskilled-worker!⇒wrkrSkilledNo,
* McsEngl.wrkrSkilledNo,
* McsEngl.wrkr.015-skilledNo!⇒wrkrSkilledNo,
* McsEngl.wrkr.skill.skilledNo!⇒wrkrSkilledNo,
* McsEngl.wrkr.skilledNo!⇒wrkrSkilledNo,

wrkr.skill.white-collar

description::
"The term "white-collar worker" refers to someone who does professional, administrative, or managerial work. These jobs typically involve mental or analytical skills rather than manual labor.
Traditionally, white-collar workers were pictured as those who wore dress shirts and ties to work in office settings. However, the definition has broadened in recent times. Here are some characteristics of white-collar jobs:
* **Focus on mental skills:** These jobs require using your brain more than your brawn. You might be analyzing data, solving problems, or creating presentations.
* **Education and training:** White-collar jobs typically require some level of education or training, such as a college degree or professional certification.
* **Salary vs. hourly pay:** White-collar workers are more likely to be salaried, meaning they receive a fixed regular payment, rather than being paid by the hour.
Here are some examples of white-collar jobs:
* Doctors
* Lawyers
* Engineers
* Teachers
* Accountants
* Business analysts
* Marketing managers
* Human resources specialists
* Software developers"
[{2024-03-23 retrieved} https://gemini.google.com/app/8b80160ab2b0d195]

name::
* McsEngl.white-collar-worker,
* McsEngl.wrkr.026-white-collar,
* McsEngl.wrkr.skill.white-collar,
* McsEngl.wrkr.white-collar,

wrkr.skill.blue-collar

description::
"A blue-collar worker is someone who performs manual labor or a skilled trade. These jobs often involve working with your hands and physical abilities more than needing a college degree.
The term originated in the early 1900s because blue-collar workers often wore work shirts or overalls made of denim or other dark, sturdy fabrics. This contrasted with white-collar workers who wore white shirts and ties in office settings.
Here are some key points about blue-collar jobs:
* **Type of work:** Blue-collar jobs involve physical labor in fields like construction, manufacturing, maintenance, and mining. They can be skilled or unskilled.
* **Skills:** While some blue-collar jobs require little formal education, others require specific skills and training learned through apprenticeships, trade schools, or on the job.
* **Pay:** Blue-collar workers may be paid hourly or by the piece (based on how much work they complete).
Some examples of blue-collar jobs include:
* Construction workers (carpenters, electricians, plumbers)
* Mechanics
* Machinists
* Welders
* Factory workers
* Truck drivers
* Farmers
* Loggers
* Landscapers
The lines between blue-collar and white-collar work can sometimes blur. For instance, some technical jobs may require both physical and mental skills. "
[{2024-03-23 retrieved} https://gemini.google.com/app/8b80160ab2b0d195]

name::
* McsEngl.blue-collar-worker,
* McsEngl.wrkr.blue-collar,
* McsEngl.wrkr.027-blue-collar,
* McsEngl.wrkr.skill.blue-collar,

wrkr.aggregate-004

description::
"labor force: People ages 15 and older who meet the International Labour Organization definition of the economically active population: those who supply labor for the production of goods and services during a specified period. This includes both the employed and the unemployed. While national practices vary in the treatment of such groups as the armed forces and seasonal or part-time workers, in general the labor force includes the armed forces, the unemployed, and first-time job-seekers, but excludes homemakers and other unpaid caregivers and workers in the informal sector."
[{2021-02-24} https://wolframalpha.com]

name::
* McsEngl.wrkr.004-aggregate!⇒wrkrAggt,
* McsEngl.wrkr.aggregate!⇒wrkrAggt,
* McsEngl.human-capital!⇒wrkrAggt,
* McsEngl.labor-force!⇒wrkrAggt,
* McsEngl.labour-force!⇒wrkrAggt,
* McsEngl.wrkrAggt,
* McsEngl.workforce!⇒wrkrAggt,
====== langoGreek:
* McsElln.ανθρώπινο-κεφάλαιο!=wrkrAggt,
* McsElln.εργατικό-δυναμικό!=wrkrAggt,

wrkrAggt.global

description::
">quantity of global-workforce:
The estimated size of the global workforce is approximately 5.135 billion people. This calculation is based on an assumption that around 65% of the global population, estimated at 7.9 billion, is of working age and available for work. Please note that this is a rough estimate and the actual figure can vary significantly based on different demographic and economic factors."
[{2023-12-15 retrieved} https://chat.openai.com/c/6c020553-ff4c-4edc-855b-795f1bed3551]

">quantity of global-workforce:
The size of the global workforce is estimated to be around **3.4 billion people** in 2023. This represents a significant increase from the 2.28 billion people employed in 1991. The growth in the global workforce is attributed to several factors, including:
* **Population growth:** The global population has been growing steadily over time, which has led to a larger pool of potential workers.
* **Economic development:** As economies develop, more people are able to participate in the workforce.
* **Increased urbanization:** People are moving to cities in large numbers, which creates more job opportunities.

The global workforce is expected to continue to grow in the coming years, reaching an estimated **4.2 billion people** by 2030. This growth will be driven primarily by population growth and economic development in developing countries.

Here is a breakdown of the global workforce by region in 2023:
| Region | Employed population (millions) | Share of global workforce (%) |
| Asia | 1.876 | 55.0 |
| Europe | 895 | 25.8 |
| North America | 391 | 11.4 |
| Latin America and the Caribbean | 230 | 6.8 |
| Africa | 190 | 5.2 |
| Middle East and North Africa | 122 | 3.6 |
| Oceania | 12 | 0.3 |

As you can see, Asia is home to the largest share of the global workforce, followed by Europe and North America. The share of the global workforce in Africa is expected to grow in the coming years, as the region's economy continues to develop."
[{2023-12-15 retrieved} https://bard.google.com/chat/a227f97b34cc88e2]

Rank | Country/Region | Labour force | Date of information
— | World | 3,382,000,000 | 2017 est.
1 | China | 791,483,000 | 2021 est.
2 | India | 476,670,100 | 2021 est.
3 | United States | 160,400,000 | 2017 est.
4 | Indonesia | 125,000,000 | 2016 est.
5 | Brazil | 104,200,000 | 2017 est.
6 | Russia | 76,530,000 | 2017 est.
7 | Bangladesh | 66,640,000 | 2017 est.
8 | Japan | 65,010,000 | 2017 est.
9 | Pakistan | 63,890,000 | 2017 est.
10 | Nigeria | 60,080,000 | 2017 est.
11 | Vietnam | 54,800,000 | 2017 est.
12 | Mexico | 54,510,000 | 2017 est.
13 | Ethiopia | 52,820,000 | 2017 est.
14 | Germany | 45,900,000 | 2017 est.
15 | Philippines | 42,780,000 | 2017 est.
16 | Thailand | 38,370,000 | 2017 est.
17 | United Kingdom | 33,500,000 | 2017 est.
18 | Democratic Republic of the Congo | 31,360,000 | 2017 est.
19 | Turkey | 31,300,000 | 2017 est.
20 | France | 30,680,000 | 2017 est.
21 | Iran | 30,500,000 | 2017 est.
22 | Egypt | 29,950,000 | 2017 est.
23 | South Korea | 27,750,000 | 2017 est.
24 | Italy | 25,940,000 | 2017 est.
25 | Colombia | 25,760,000 | 2017 est.
26 | Tanzania | 24,890,000 | 2017 est.
27 | Spain | 22,750,000 | 2017 est.
28 | Myanmar | 22,300,000 | 2017 est.
29 | South Africa | 22,190,000 | 2017 est.
30 | Kenya | 19,600,000 | 2017 est.
31 | Canada | 19,520,000 | 2017 est.
32 | Uzbekistan | 18,120,000 | 2017 est.
33 | Argentina | 18,000,000 | 2017 est.
34 | Ukraine | 17,990,000 | 2017 est.
35 | Poland | 17,600,000 | 2017 est.
36 | Uganda | 17,400,000 | 2013 est.
37 | Peru | 16,160,000 | 2012 est.
38 | Nepal | 16,000,000 | 2011 est.
39 | Venezuela | 14,010,000 | 2013 est.
40 | Malaysia | 13,190,000 | 2013 est.
41 | North Korea | 12,600,000 | 2012 est.
42 | Australia | 12,440,000 | 2013 est.
43 | Ghana | 12,070,000 | 2013 est.
44 | Sudan | 11,920,000 | 2007 est.
45 | Taiwan | 11,780,000 | 2017 est.
46 | Morocco | 11,730,000 | 2013 est.
47 | Algeria | 11,150,000 | 2013 est.
48 | Mozambique | 10,550,000 | 2013 est.
49 | Madagascar | 9,504,000 | 2007
50 | Romania | 9,451,000 | 2013 est.
51 | Netherlands | 9,090,000 | 2018 est.
52 | Kazakhstan | 9,022,000 | 2013 est.
53 | Angola | 9,018,000 | 2013 est.
54 | Iraq | 8,900,000 | 2010 est.
55 | Sri Lanka | 8,528,000 | 2013 est.
56 | Cameroon | 8,426,000 | 2013 est.
57 | Saudi Arabia | 8,412,000 | 2013 est.
58 | Chile | 8,367,000 | 2013 est.
59 | Côte d'Ivoire | 7,928,000 | 2013 est.
60 | Cambodia | 7,900,000 | 2011 est.
61 | Afghanistan | 7,512,000 | 2012 est.
62 | Yemen | 7,100,000 | 2013 est.
63 | Ecuador | 6,953,000 | 2013 est.
64 | Burkina Faso | 6,668,000 | 2007
65 | Zambia | 6,275,000 | 2013 est.
66 | Senegal | 6,096,000 | 2013 est.
67 | Malawi | 5,747,000 | 2007 est.
68 | Guinea | 5,409,000 | 2013 est.
69 | Portugal | 5,395,000 | 2013 est.
70 | United Arab Emirates | 5,340,000 | 2017 est.
71 | Czech Republic | 5,304,000 | 2013 est.
71 | Cuba | 5,233,000 | 2013 est.
72 | Belgium | 5,150,000 | 2013 est.
73 | Sweden | 5,107,000 | 2013 est.
74 | Syria | 5,014,000 | 2013 est.
75 | Belarus | 5,000,000 | 2009
76 | Switzerland | 4,976,000 | 2013 est.
77 | Bolivia | 4,992,000 | 2012 est.
78 | Greece | 4,918,000 | 2013 est.
79 | Dominican Republic | 4,912,000 | 2013 est.
80 | Haiti | 4,810,000 | 2010 est.
81 | Niger | 4,688,000 | 2007
82 | Azerbaijan | 4,680,000 | 2012 est.
84 | Guatemala | 4,465,000 | 2013 est.
85 | Rwanda | 4,446,000 | 2007
86 | Chad | 4,293,000 | 2007
87 | Hungary | 4,263,000 | 2013 est.
88 | Burundi | 4,245,000 | 2007
89 | Papua New Guinea | 4,077,000 | 2013 est.
90 | Tunisia | 3,974,000 | 2013 est.
91 | Zimbabwe | 3,939,000 | 2013 est.
92 | Hong Kong | 3,873,000 | 2013 est.
93 | Austria | 4,707,000 | 2022[2]
94 | Benin | 3,662,000 | 2007 est.
95 | Honduras | 3,507,000 | 2013 est.
96 | Israel | 3,493,000 | 2013 est.
97 | Somalia | 3,447,000 | 2007
98 | Singapore | 3,444,000 | 2013 est.
99 | Laos | 3,337,000 | 2013 est.
100 | Mali | 3,241,000 | 2007 est.
101 | Paraguay | 3,190,000 | 2013 est.
102 | Nicaragua | 3,039,000 | 2013 est.
103 | Eritrea | 2,955,000 | 2012 est.
104 | Republic of the Congo | 2,890,000 | 2011 est.
105 | Denmark | 2,795,000 | 2013 est.
106 | El Salvador | 2,738,000 | 2013 est.
107 | Slovakia | 2,727,000 | 2013 est.
108 | Norway | 2,707,000 | 2014 est.
109 | Finland | 2,685,000 | 2013 est.
110 | Togo | 2,595,000 | 2007
111 | Bulgaria | 2,551,000 | 2013 est.
112 | New Zealand | 2,413,000 | 2013 est.
113 | Kuwait | 2,380,000 | 2013 est.
114 | Kyrgyzstan | 2,344,000 | 2007
115 | Turkmenistan | 2,300,000 | 2008 est.
116 | Costa Rica | 2,222,000 | 2013 est.
117 | Tajikistan | 2,209,000 | 2013 est.
118 | Sierra Leone | 2,207,000 | 2007 est.
119 | Ireland | 2,161,000 | 2013 est.
120 | Central African Republic | 2,082,000 | 2011 est.
121 | Georgia | 1,959,000 | 2011 est.
122 | Jordan | 1,898,000 | 2013 est.
123 | Croatia | 1,715,000 | 2013 est.
107 | Serbia | 2,920,000 | 2017 est.
125 | Uruguay | 1,700,000 | 2013 est.
126 | Libya | 1,644,000 | 2013 est.
127 | Panama | 1,540,000 | 2013 est.
128 | Lebanon | 1,481,000 | 2007 est.
129 | Lithuania | 1,452,000 | 2013 est.
130 | Qatar | 1,424,000 | 2013 est.
131 | Armenia | 1,394,000 | 2013 est.
132 | Liberia | 1,372,000 | 2007
133 | Mauritania | 1,318,000 | 2007
134 | Botswana | 1,308,000 | 2013 est.
135 | Puerto Rico | 1,300,000 | 2012
136 | Jamaica | 1,261,000 | 2013 est.
137 | Moldova | 1,327,000 | 2013 est.
138 | Albania | 1,090,000 | 2013 est.
139 | Mongolia | 1,068,000 | 2011 est.
140 | Bosnia and Herzegovina | 1,026,337 | 2017[3]
— | West Bank | 1,025,000 | 2013 est.
141 | Latvia | 1,022,000 | 2013 est.
142 | Oman | 968,800 | 2007
143 | Macedonia | 960,700 | 2013 est.
144 | Slovenia | 913,400 | 2013 est.
145 | Namibia | 880,400 | 2013 est.
146 | Lesotho | 874,200 | 2013 est.
147 | Kosovo | 800,000 | 2011 est.
148 | Gambia | 777,100 | 2007
149 | Bahrain | 716,500 | 2013 est.
150 | Estonia | 692,900 | 2013 est.
151 | Mauritius | 637,600 | 2013 est.
152 | Guinea-Bissau | 632,700 | 2007
153 | Gabon | 629,100 | 2013 est.
154 | Trinidad and Tobago | 621,000 | 2013 est.
155 | Cyprus | 443,500 | 2013 est.
156 | Swaziland | 424,100 | 2011 est.
157 | Timor-Leste | 418,200 | 2009
— | Macau | 367,800 | 2013 est.
— | Gaza Strip | 348,200 | 2010 est.
158 | Bhutan | 336,400 | 2012
159 | Fiji | 335,000 | 2007 est.
160 | Guyana | 313,100 | 2009 est.
161 | Djibouti | 294,600 | 2012
162 | Montenegro | 251,300 | 2011 est.
163 | Comoros | 233,500 | 2011 est.
164 | Luxembourg | 208,800 | 2013 est.
165 | Brunei | 205,800 | 2011 est.
166 | Solomon Islands | 202,500 | 2007
167 | Bahamas | 196,900 | 2013 est.
168 | Cape Verde | 196,100 | 2007
169 | Equatorial Guinea | 195,200 | 2007
170 | Malta | 190,400 | 2013 est.
171 | Iceland | 181,100 | 2013 est.
172 | Suriname | 165,600 | 2007
173 | Maldives | 159,700 | 2012
— | Western Sahara | 144,000 | 2010 est.
174 | Barbados | 141,800 | 2013 est.
175 | Belize | 120,500 | 2008 est.
— | French Polynesia | 116,000 | 2007
176 | Vanuatu | 115,900 | 2007
— | New Caledonia | 106,400 | 2010
177 | Saint Lucia | 79,700 | 2012
— | Curaçao | 73,100 | 2013
178 | Guam | 69,390 | 2010 est.
179 | Grenada | 59,900 | 2013 est.
180 | Saint Vincent and the Grenadines | 57,520 | 2007 est.
— | Jersey | 53,380 | 2012
181 | Sao Tome and Principe | 52,490 | 2007
182 | Monaco | 52,490 | 2012 est.
183 | Aruba | 51,610 | 2007 est.
— | U.S. Virgin Islands | 49,820 | 2007 est.
184 | Samoa | 47,930 | 2011 est.
— | Isle of Man | 41,790 | 2006
185 | Tonga | 39,960 | 2007
186 | Seychelles | 39,560 | 2006
— | Cayman Islands | 39,000 | 2007
— | Northern Mariana Islands | 38,450 | 2005 est.
187 | Bermuda | 37,400 | 2011
188 | Andorra | 36,060 | 2012
189 | Liechtenstein | 35,830 | 2012
— | Faroe Islands | 34,710 | 2010
— | Guernsey | 31,470 | 2006
190 | Antigua and Barbuda | 30,000 | 1991
191 | Greenland | 28,600 | 2011
192 | Dominica | 25,000 | 2000 est.
— | Sint Maarten | 23,200 | 2008 est.
193 | San Marino | 21,960 | 2013
194 | Saint Kitts and Nevis | 18,170 | 1995
— | American Samoa | 17,630 | 2005
— | Saint Martin | 17,300 | N/A
195 | Federated States of Micronesia | 15,920 | 2022
— | British Virgin Islands | 12,770 | 2004
196 | Gibraltar | 12,690 | 2001
197 | Marshall Islands | 10,480 | 2011 est.
198 | Palau | 9,777 | 2005
199 | Kiribati | 7,870 | 2001
— | Cook Islands | 6,820 | 2001
— | Anguilla | 6,049 | 2001
— | Falkland Islands | 5,246 | 2006
— | Turks and Caicos Islands | 4,848 | 1990 est.
— | Montserrat | 4,521 | 2012
200 | Tuvalu | 3,615 | 2004 est.
— | Saint Pierre and Miquelon | 3,450 | 2006
— | Wallis and Futuna | 3,104 | 2003
201 | Vatican City | 2,832 | 2011
— | Saint Helena | 2,486 | 1998 est.
— | Svalbard | 1,234 | 2003
— | Norfolk Island | 978 | 2006
202 | Niue | 663 | 2001
— | Tokelau | 440 | 2001
— | Pitcairn Islands | 15 | 2004
This is a list of countries by size of the labour force mostly based on The World Factbook.
[{2024-01-06 retrieved} https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_labour_force]

name::
* McsEngl.global-workforce!⇒wrkrAggtGlobal,
* McsEngl.wrkrAggt.global!⇒wrkrAggtGlobal,
* McsEngl.wrkrAggtGlobal!=global-workforce,

wrkrAggt.economy

description::
· every economy has a-number of workers.

name::
* McsEngl.Socecon'worker,
* McsEngl.human-capital--of-economy,
* McsEngl.sectorHshd'worker,
* McsEngl.wrkrAggt.economy,

wrkrAggt.sector

description::
">workers per global industry:
According to the International Labour Organization (ILO), the distribution of workers by major industry group in 2021 was as follows:
| Industry Group | Number of Workers (Millions) | Share of Total Employment |
| Agriculture, forestry and fishing | 866.3 | 29.5% |
| Manufacturing | 256.1 | 8.2% |
| Construction | 96.6 | 3.1% |
| Wholesale and retail trade; repair of motor vehicles and motorcycles | 167.2 | 5.4% |
| Transportation and storage | 127.1 | 4.1% |
| Accommodation and food service activities | 138.0 | 4.5% |
| Information and communication | 108.6 | 3.5% |
| Financial and insurance activities | 77.3 | 2.5% |
| Real estate and professional, scientific and technical activities | 117.6 | 3.9% |
| Administration and support service activities | 126.6 | 4.2% |
| Public administration and defense; compulsory social security | 61.8 | 1.9% |
| Education | 241.4 | 7.8% |
| Human health and social work activities | 149.1 | 5.0% |
| Arts, entertainment and recreation | 37.1 | 1.2% |
| Other service activities | 108.6 | 3.5% |
It is important to note that these figures are estimates and may vary depending on the source. Additionally, the distribution of workers by industry can vary significantly from country to country."
[{2024-01-01 retrieved} https://bard.google.com/chat/a668f4b1cc9da3c4]

name::
* McsEngl.wrkrAggt.sector,

wrkr.job.professional-007

description::
"A professional is a member of a profession or any person who earns their living from a specified professional activity. The term also describes the standards of education and training that prepare members of the profession with the particular knowledge and skills necessary to perform their specific role within that profession. In addition, most professionals are subject to strict codes of conduct, enshrining rigorous ethical and moral obligations.[1] Professional standards of practice and ethics for a particular field are typically agreed upon and maintained through widely recognized professional associations, such as the IEEE.[2] Some definitions of "professional" limit this term to those professions that serve some important aspect of public interest[3] and the general good of society.[4][5]
In some cultures, the term is used as shorthand to describe a particular social stratum of well-educated workers who enjoy considerable work autonomy and who are commonly engaged in creative and intellectually challenging work.[6][7][8][9]"
[{2020-08-14} https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Professional]

name::
* McsEngl.wrkrProfessional,
* McsEngl.wrkr.007-professional!⇒wrkrProfessional,
* McsEngl.wrkr.job.professional!⇒wrkrProfessional,
* McsEngl.wrkr.professional!⇒wrkrProfessional,

wrkr.job.professionalNo-010

description::
· professionalNo is a-worker who does-not-earn his living from this working.

name::
* McsEngl.amateur-worker!⇒wrkrProfessionalNo,
* McsEngl.professionalNo-worker!⇒wrkrProfessionalNo,
* McsEngl.wrkrProfessionalNo,
* McsEngl.wrkr.010-professionalNo!⇒wrkrProfessionalNo,
* McsEngl.wrkr.job.professionalNo!⇒wrkrProfessionalNo,
* McsEngl.wrkr.professionalNo!⇒wrkrProfessionalNo,

wrkr.job.one-012

description::
·

name::
* McsEngl.wrkrJobOne,
* McsEngl.wrkr.012-job.one!⇒wrkrJobOne,
* McsEngl.wrkr.job.one!⇒wrkrJobOne,

wrkr.job.many-013

description::
·

name::
* McsEngl.wrkrJobMany,
* McsEngl.wrkr.013-job.many!⇒wrkrJobMany,
* McsEngl.wrkr.job.many!⇒wrkrJobMany,

wrkr.sfr.artist-023

description::
artist is an-art worker.
===
"(n) artist, creative person (a person whose creative work shows sensitivity and imagination)"
[{2021-12-14 retrieved} http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=artist]

name::
* McsEngl.artist!⇒wrkrArtist,
* McsEngl.wrkr.023-artist!⇒wrkrArtist,
* McsEngl.wrkr.artist!⇒wrkrArtist,
* McsEngl.wrkr.sfr.artist!⇒wrkrArtist,
* McsEngl.wrkrArtist,
====== langoChinese:
* McsZhon.yìshùjiā-艺术家!=wrkrArtist,
* McsZhon.艺术家-yìshùjiā!=wrkrArtist,
====== langoGreek:
* McsElln.καλλιτέχνης!ο!=wrkrArtist,

wrkrArtist.SPECIFIC

description::
·

name::
* McsEngl.wrkrArtist.specific,

wrkrArtist.role-player

description::
"(n) actor, histrion, player, thespian, role player (a theatrical performer)"
[{2021-12-14 retrieved} http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=actor]

name::
* McsEngl.actor!⇒wrkrRoleplayer,
* McsEngl.wrkr.024-actor!⇒wrkrRoleplayer,
* McsEngl.wrkr.actor!⇒wrkrRoleplayer,
* McsEngl.wrkrActor!⇒wrkrRoleplayer,
* McsEngl.wrkrArtist.actor!⇒wrkrRoleplayer,
* McsEngl.wrkrRoleplayer,
====== langoChinese:
* McsZhon.yǎnyuán-演员!=wrkrRoleplayer,
* McsZhon.演员-yǎnyuán!=wrkrRoleplayer,
====== langoGreek:
* McsElln.ηθοποιός!=wrkrRoleplayer,

wrkrRoleplayer.male

description::
·

name::
* McsEngl.wrkrRoleplayer.male,

wrkrRoleplayer.female

description::
·

name::
* McsEngl.actress,
* McsEngl.wrkrRoleplayer.female,
====== langoChinese:
* McsZhon.nǚyǎnyuán-女演员!=wrkrRoleplayer.female,
* McsZhon.女演员-nǚyǎnyuán!=wrkrRoleplayer.female,

wrkrArtist.singer

description::
·

name::
* McsEngl.wrkr.025-singer,
* McsEngl.wrkr.singer,
* McsEngl.wrkrArtist.singer,

wrkr.sfr.counselor-011

description::
"Counseling is the professional guidance of the individual by utilizing psychological methods especially in collecting case history data, using various techniques of the personal interview, and testing interests and aptitudes.[1]"
[{2020-08-20} https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_counseling_topics]

name::
* McsEngl.counselor!⇒wrkrCounselor,
* McsEngl.wrkrCounselor,
* McsEngl.wrkr.011-counselor!⇒wrkrCounselor,
* McsEngl.wrkr.counselor!⇒wrkrCounselor,
* McsEngl.wrkr.satisfier.counselor!⇒wrkrCounselor,
====== langoGreek:
* McsElln.σύμβουλος!=wrkrCounselor,

wrkr.sfr.homemaker-008

description::
"Homemaking is a mainly American and Canadian term for the management of a home, otherwise known as housework, housekeeping, or household management. It is the act of overseeing the organizational, day-to-day operations of a house or estate, and the managing of other domestic concerns. A person in charge of the homemaking, who is not employed outside the home, in the United States is called a homemaker, a term for a housewife or a househusband. The term "homemaker", however, may also refer to a social worker who manages a household during the incapacity of the housewife or househusband.[1]
Homemaking can be the full-time responsibility of one parent or soliton, shared with children or extended family, or shared or traded off between spouses as one or both work outside the home. It can also be outsourced partially or completely to paid help. In previous decades, there were a number of mandatory courses for the young to learn the skills of homemaking. In high school, courses included cooking, nutrition, home economics, family and consumer science (FACS), and food and cooking hygiene.[citation needed]"
[{2020-08-15} https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Homemaking]

name::
* McsEngl.homemaker!⇒wrkrHome,
* McsEngl.wrkrHome,
* McsEngl.wrkr.008-homemaker!⇒wrkrHome,
* McsEngl.wrkr.satisfier.homemaker!⇒wrkrHome,

wrkr.forwhom.self

description::
· when the-antithesis employer-employee will-be-resolved, the-worker will-be a-self-worker.
· compensated with his product.

name::
* McsEngl.Autoecon'worker!⇒wrkrSelf,
* McsEngl.Autosoc'att011-worker!⇒wrkrSelf,
* McsEngl.Autoworker!⇒wrkrSelf,
* McsEngl.wrkr.029-self!⇒wrkrSelf,
* McsEngl.wrkr.self!⇒wrkrSelf,
* McsEngl.wrkr.forwhom.self!⇒wrkrSelf,
* McsEngl.self-worker!⇒wrkrSelf,
* McsEngl.wrkrSelf,

wrkr.forwhom.employer

description::
· compensated with a-wage.

">wage worker:
A wage worker, also known as a laborer, wage earner, or employee, is a person who sells their labor power in exchange for a wage. Wage workers are employed by a business or organization and are typically paid hourly, daily, or weekly. They do not own the means of production (e.g., factories, machinery, or tools) and are not self-employed.

**Key characteristics of wage workers:**
* **Sell their labor power:** Wage workers sell their time and skills to an employer in exchange for a wage.
* **No ownership of means of production:** Wage workers do not own the tools, machinery, or other resources used to produce goods or services.
* **Dependence on an employer:** Wage workers rely on their employer for their livelihood.
* **Hierarchical relationship:** Wage workers are typically subordinate to their employers in a hierarchical organizational structure.
* **Wage as the primary source of income:** Wage workers typically earn their primary income from their wages.
* **Limited control over work:** Wage workers typically have limited control over their work, including their tasks, hours, and working conditions.

**Types of wage workers**
Wage workers can be categorized into different types based on their job characteristics, skills, and level of education. Some common types of wage workers include:
* **Factory workers:** Engage in tasks related to manufacturing and production.
* **Service workers:** Provide services to customers, such as retail workers, hospitality workers, and healthcare professionals.
* **Professionals:** Possess specialized skills and knowledge, such as doctors, engineers, lawyers, and teachers.
* **Managers:** Supervise and coordinate the work of other employees.

**Impact of technology on wage workers**
Technology has had a significant impact on the lives of wage workers, both positive and negative.

**Positive impacts:**
* **Increased productivity:** Technology has enabled businesses to automate tasks and improve efficiency, leading to increased productivity.
* **New employment opportunities:** Technology has created new employment opportunities in fields such as software development, data analysis, and artificial intelligence.
* **Improved working conditions:** Technology can help to improve working conditions by reducing the physical demands of work and increasing safety.

**Negative impacts:**
* **Job displacement:** Technology can lead to job displacement as automation replaces certain tasks and roles.
* **Precarious work:** The rise of the gig economy and temporary work arrangements has created more precarious work for some wage workers.
* **Increased worker surveillance:** Technology can be used to monitor and surveil workers, raising concerns about privacy and freedom.

As technology continues to evolve, the impact on wage workers is likely to become more complex and multifaceted. It is important for governments, businesses, and workers to work together to ensure that technology is used to create a more equitable and secure future for all."
[{2023-12-10 retrieved} https://bard.google.com/chat/b9adef90f0dee228]

name::
* McsEngl.wrkr.030-employee!⇒wrkrWage,
* McsEngl.wrkr.employee!⇒wrkrWage,
* McsEngl.wage-worker!⇒wrkrWage,
* McsEngl.wrkrWage,

wrkr.forwhom.landowner

description::
· compensated with a-part of his product.

">serf worker:
A serf worker refers to a laborer during the Middle Ages in Europe who was bound to work on his lord's estate. Serfdom was a condition of bondage or modified slavery which developed primarily during the High Middle Ages and lasted in some countries until the mid-19th century. Serfs were different from slaves in that they were tied to the land, not owned outright by the lord of the manor. This meant that a serf could not be sold apart from the land they worked on. They were required to provide labor, pay rents, and be subject to the lord’s control, but in return, they had some rights to protection, to cultivate certain fields for their own use, and to pass the land to their heirs.
The specifics of serfdom varied greatly over time and geography. In some places, serfs could hold property, marry and raise a family, and could not be arbitrarily displaced. However, they were often subject to taxes and duties, and their freedom of movement was restricted. The obligations and protections afforded to serfs also varied. For example, in some regions, serfs were required to work the lord's land for a certain number of days each week or year, which was known as corvée labor.
Serfdom declined with the advent of the commercial revolution, changes in agricultural practices, the growth of cities, and the development of more modern forms of labor. Legal reforms and revolutions contributed to the gradual abolition of serfdom in Europe from the late 18th century through the 19th century, culminating in events such as the Emancipation Reform of 1861 in Russia, which formally freed the serfs."
[{2024-02-04 retrieved} https://chat.openai.com/c/9cafba45-5f77-49c9-b1e3-6cc6936f006e]

name::
* McsEngl.wrkr.031-serf!⇒wrkrSerf,
* McsEngl.wrkr.serf!⇒wrkrSerf,
* McsEngl.wrkr.forwhom.landowner!⇒wrkrSerf,
* McsEngl.wrkrSerf,
====== langoGreek:
* McsElln.δουλοπάροικος!ο!=wrkrSerf,

wrkr.forwhom.master

description::
· slave is a-worker who is a-commodity.
· compensated with survival means.

name::
* McsEngl.wrkr.022-commodity!⇒wrkrSlave,
* McsEngl.wrkr.commodity!⇒wrkrSlave,
* McsEngl.wrkr.forwhom.master!⇒wrkrSlave,
* McsEngl.wrkr.slave!⇒wrkrSlave,
* McsEngl.slave!⇒wrkrSlave,
* McsEngl.wrkrSlave!=slave,
====== langoGreek:
* McsElln.δούλος!ο!=wrkrSlave,

wrkr.forwhom.proto-self

description::
· hunter-gatherers and early farmers.

name::
* McsEngl.wrkr.forwhom.proto-self!⇒wrkrSelfProto,
* McsEngl.wrkr.032-proto-self!⇒wrkrSelfProto,
* McsEngl.wrkr.proto-self!⇒wrkrSelfProto,
* McsEngl.proto-self-worker!⇒wrkrSelfProto,
* McsEngl.wrkrSelfProto!=proto-self-worker,

meta-info

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SEARCH::
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footer::
• author: Kaseluris.Nikos.1959
• email:
 
• edit on github: https://github.com/synagonism/McsWorld/blob/master/dirStn/McsStn000011.last.html,
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webpage-versions::
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• McsHmn000002Wkr.0-1-0.2020-07-12.last.html: draft creation,

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